Or

Open access

NEWS - Pharmacology

Fluoroquinolones and the risk of aortopathy: A systematic review and meta-analysis – International Journal of Cardiology (free)

“…current fluoroquinolone use was significantly associated with increased risk of aortic aneurysm and dissection.”

 


Cannabinoids for Chronic Pain – Therapeutics Initiative (free)

Related: Meta-Analysis: Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Chronic Noncancer Pain Conditions (free) AND Guideline for Prescribing Medical Cannabinoids in Primary Care (free article and commentary)

“At the present time we lack good evidence that any cannabis-derived product works for chronic pain”

 


Antipsychotic drug use and pneumonia: Systematic review and meta-analysis – Journal of Psychopharmacology (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentary: Antipsychotics May Increase Risk of Pneumonia, Meta-Analysis Suggests – Psychiatric News Alert (free)

“Although antipsychotic use was associated with a higher risk of pneumonia, the researchers stopped short of claiming causality, citing a lack of data from randomized, controlled trials and a failure of observational studies to control for relevant confounders like tobacco use and weight.” (from Psychiatric News Alert)

 


Prophylactic antibiotic therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) – Cochrane Library (free)

Summary: Preventative antibiotic therapy for people with COPD – Cochrane Library (free)

“Use of continuous and intermittent prophylactic antibiotics results in a clinically significant benefit in reducing exacerbations in COPD patients.”

 



Efficacy, effectiveness, and safety of herpes zoster vaccines in adults aged 50 and older: systematic review and network meta-analysis – The BMJ (free)

“Using the adjuvant recombinant subunit vaccine might prevent more cases of herpes zoster than using the live attenuated vaccine, but the adjuvant recombinant subunit vaccine also carries a greater risk of adverse events at injection sites.”

 


Pantoprazole in Patients at Risk for Gastrointestinal Bleeding in the ICU – New England Journal of Medicine (free for a limited period)

Editorial: Proton-Pump Inhibitor Prophylaxis in the ICU — Benefits Worth the Risks? (free for a limited period)

“Proton pump inhibitors are minimally effective to reduce GI bleeding among the critically ill folks at high risk for stress ulcers. Takeaways: no role for routine PPI for any patients on the WARDS, and shouldn’t be considered ‘routine’ in the ICU” (via @AnilMakam see Tweet)

 


The Problem With Probiotics – The New York Times (free)

Related: Probiotic Safety—No Guarantees (free perspective)

“There are potential harms as well as benefits, and a lot of wishful thinking and imprecision in the marketing of products containing them.”

 


Antibiotics May Soon Become Useless. Now What? – WIRED (a few articles per month are free)

 


Shingrix: A New Vaccine for Shingles – Therapeutics Initiative (free)

“Need to vaccinate 31 people to prevent one instance of HZ; Need to vaccinate 358 people to prevent one instance on post herpetic neuralgia” (via @amtejani)

 


Given Their Potential for Harm, It’s Time to Focus on the Safety of Supplements – JAMA (free for a limited period) (via @NUNESDOC)

“About 23 000 visits to emergency departments each year can be attributed to adverse events from dietary supplements.”

 


Deprescribing recommendations: An essential consideration for clinical guideline developers – Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy (free)

Related: Position Statement: Reducing Inappropriate Medication Use & Polypharmacy (several articles and commentaries on the subject)

““Clinical guidelines often do not accommodate frailty or patients with multiple comorbid conditions. This can give rise to complex medication regimens and risk of medication harm.” Paper discusses the need to include deprescribing in clinical guidelines” (via @Deprescribing see Tweet)

 


Probiotic Safety—No Guarantees – JAMA Internal Medicine (free for a limited period)

Related: Probiotics: Does the Evidence Match the Hype? (free articles and commentaries) AND Systematic Review: Harms Reporting in Trials with Probiotics (link to abstract and commentaries)

 


Extended antibiotic infusions could save lives: Here’s how to do it – PulmCCM (free)

Related Research: Mortality lower with prolonged vs. short-term IV infusion of antipseudomonal beta-lactams (free)

“The simplest (and cheapest) technique is simply to reduce the time between doses.”

 


Seven days of antibiotics were as good as 14 for gram-negative bacteremia – PulmCCM (free)

Related Commentary: Seven-day antibiotic course delivers similar outcomes to 14-days for Gram-negative bacteraemia – European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, via EurekAlert (free)

“It’s important to note that source control was believed to be achieved in all enrolled patients. If source control cannot be achieved (e.g., an abscess, or an infected heart valve or indwelling catheter that cannot safely be removed), prolonged antibiotic courses are often advisable.”

 


Aspirin Plus Clopidogrel vs Aspirin Alone for Preventing Cardiovascular Events Among Patients at High Risk for Cardiovascular Events – JAMA (free for a limited period)

“Clopidogrel+ASA: Reduced risk for MI and ischemic stroke – Increased risk for major bleeding compared with aspirin alone. Combined therapy is NOT associated with lower mortality.” (via @ehlJAMA see Tweet)

 


Antidepressant Withdrawal Syndrome – Therapeutics Initiative (free)

Related Perspective: Many People Taking Antidepressants Discover They Cannot Quit – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

“Antidepressants should be added to the list of drugs associated with tolerance, dependence and a withdrawal syndrome.”

“Withdrawal symptoms occur in at least one-third of patients who stop.”

 


Effects of aspirin on risks of vascular events and cancer according to bodyweight and dose: analysis of individual patient data from randomised trials – The Lancet (free)

Commentaries: Weight-adjusted aspirin for cardiovascular prevention – The Lancet (free) AND One dose of aspirin doesn’t fit all – University of Oxford (free)

Practice Changing Article. “Low doses of aspirin (75–100 mg) were only effective in preventing vascular events in patients weighing less than 70 kg, and had no benefit in the 80% of men and nearly 50% of all women weighing 70 kg or more. By contrast, higher doses of aspirin were only effective in patients weighing 70 kg or more.”

 


The right diet can boost potency of cancer drugs – Nature News (free)

Original article: Suppression of insulin feedback enhances the efficacy of PI3K inhibitors – Nature (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Related: Top oncologist to study effect of diet on cancer drugs – The Guardian (free)

“Diets appear to matter in mouse cancer Rx – can these preclinical findings be translated to humans?” (via @Aiims1742 see Tweet)

 


Antibiotics should be restricted for COPD – National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (free)

Commentaries: Antibiotics should be restricted for COPD, says NICE – OnMedica (free) AND UK officials recommend limits on antibiotics for COPD – CIDRAP (free)

“The draft antimicrobial guidance recommends that antibiotics should be offered to people who have a severe flare up of symptoms, also known as a severe acute exacerbation”

 


Long-acting Reversible Contraception—Highly Efficacious, Safe, and Underutilized – JAMA (free for a limited period)

Clinical Review Audio: Return of the IUD: Long-acting Reversible Contraception Is Safe and Effective (free)

 


Metformin exposure in first trimester of pregnancy and risk of all or specific congenital anomalies: exploratory case-control study – The BMJ (free)

In this large international, population-based database, no evidence was found of an overall increased risk of congenital anomalies after first trimester metformin exposure.

 


Association of Initiation of Basal Insulin Analogs vs Neutral Protamine Hagedorn Insulin With Hypoglycemia-Related Emergency Department Visits or Hospital Admissions and With Glycemic Control in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes – JAMA (free for a limited period)

Editorial: Revisiting NPH Insulin for Type 2 Diabetes: Is a Step Back the Path Forward? (free for a limited period)

Clinical Review Audio: Health Care Spending Gone Wild: Using Expensive Insulin Analogs With Few Clinical Advantages (free)

“Long-acting insulin analogs not associated with reduced hypoglycemia-related ED visits or hospital admissions when compared with NPH insulin, despite costing 5-10x as much” (via @jsross119 see Tweet)

 


Association of Antidepressant Use With Drug-Related Extrapyramidal Symptoms: A Pharmacoepidemiological Study – Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: Incidence of Extrapyramidal Symptoms Higher With Certain Antidepressants – MPR (free) AND Antidepressants tied to Parkinson’s-like symptoms – Univadis (free registration required)

“Observational study: Incidence of EPSs with antidepressants. RRs: duloxetine, 5.68; mirtazapine, 3.78; citalopram, 3.47; escitalopram, 3.23; paroxetine, 3.07; sertraline, 2.57; venlafaxine, 2.37; bupropion, 2.31; and fluoxetine, 2.03 (all significant)” (via @psychopharmacol see Tweet)

 


Practice guideline update summary: Efficacy and tolerability of the new antiepileptic drugs – American Academy of Neurology and the American Epilepsy Society

Part I: Treatment of new-onset epilepsy (free PDF)

Part II: Treatment-resistant epilepsy (free PDF)

Commentary: New Epilepsy Guidelines Shed Light on Explosion of New Drugs – MedPage Today (free registration required)

 


A Placebo-Controlled Trial of Bezafibrate in Primary Biliary Cholangitis – New England Journal of Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: A Trial of Bezafibrate in Primary Biliary Cholangitis – NEJM Resident 360 (free) AND Bezafibrate Normalizes Liver Enzymes in PBC – MedPage Today (free registration required)

“In a randomized trial of patients with primary biliary cholangitis, bezafibrate and ursodeoxycholic acid resulted in a higher rate of complete biochemical response than ursodeoxycholic acid alone” (via @NEJM see Tweet with visual abstract)

 


Continuous low-dose antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent urinary tract infection in adults who perform clean intermittent self-catheterisation: the AnTIC RCT – Health Technology Assessment (free)

“The results of this large randomised trial, conducted in accordance with best practice, demonstrate clear benefit for antibiotic prophylaxis in terms of reducing the frequency of UTI for people carrying out CISC”.

 


Stimulants for ADHD in children: Revisited – Therapeutics Initiative (via @AllenFrancesMD)

“There is convincing evidence that a proportion of boys and girls treated with stimulants in BC and around the world are simply the youngest in their class”

 


Effect of Fremanezumab Compared With Placebo for Prevention of Episodic Migraine: A Randomized Clinical Trial – JAMA (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentary: Fremanezumab effective in preventing episodic migraine – 2 Minute Medicine (free)

“Among patients with episodic migraine in whom multiple medication classes had not previously failed, subcutaneous fremanezumab, compared with placebo, resulted in a statistically significant 1.3- to 1.5-day reduction in the mean number of monthly migraine days over a 12-week period”. (from JAMA)

“The small effect size in terms of reduction in number of days with migraine dampens enthusiasm for this medication, though without head-to-head comparison against other prophylactics, this is hard to assess” (from 2 Minute Medicine)

 


Aldosterone Antagonist Therapy and Mortality in Patients With ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction Without Heart Failure: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis – JAMA Internal Medicine (free for a limited period)

Invited Commentary: Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists in ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction – JAMA Internal Medicine (free for a limited period)

Aldosterone antagonists are beneficial for patients with STEMI and reduced ejection fraction. This meta-analysis suggests that patients with STEMI and LVEF greater than 40% or without heart failure also have improved outcomes with aldosterone antagonists.

 


Dose Increase Versus Unchanged Continuation of Antidepressants After Initial Antidepressant Treatment Failure in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Double-Blind Trials – The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentary: Depression: boosting SSRIs doesn’t work – Univadis (free registration required)

“Meta-analysis: there is evidence from RCTs against increasing the dose of SSRIs (with the possible exception of citalopram) in adult patients with major depression and antidepressant treatment failure” (via @psychopharmacol see Tweet)

 


ASCO 2018: Shortening Adjuvant Trastuzumab to 6 Months in Patients With HER2-Positive Early Breast Cancer Is Effective and Reduces Cardiac Toxicities – The ASCO Post (free)

Commentaries: Test of Herceptin Finds Briefer Treatment Can Work, With Fewer Side Effects – NPR (free) AND Shorter drug treatment OK for many breast cancer patients – Associated Press (free) AND For Women With Early Breast Cancer, Herceptin Treatment Can Be Much Shorter – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

““For women with early-stage breast cancer who needed the drug Herceptin, 6 months of treatment were as good as 12, a major study found. Less risk of side effects, less cost, less time “being a patient.”” (via @NYTHealth see Tweet)

 


Methylphenidate for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents – assessment of adverse events in non-randomised studies – Cochrane Library (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Summary: Methylphenidate for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents – assessment of harmful effects – Cochrane Library (free)

“Our findings suggest that methylphenidate may be associated with a number of serious adverse events as well as a large number of non-serious adverse events in children and adolescents, which often lead to withdrawal of methylphenidate”.

 


Page 1 of 512345
Stay Updated in Your Specialty
No spam, just news
Unsubscribe with one click

 

Daily

 

Weekly or Less Often 
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •