Patient Safety & Quality

Offline: Touch—the first language – The Lancet (free)

Related: Of Slide Rules and Stethoscopes: AI and the Future of Doctoring – The Hastings Center Report (free)

 

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Are zombie doctors taking over America? – TEDMED (free)

Source: MedPage Today

“Physician Zubin Damania, Director of Healthcare Development for Downtown Project Las Vegas, has a plan to fight back against a system that can dehumanize doctors and patients alike.”

 


Disappointment in the Value-Based Era: Time for a Fresh Approach? – JAMA (free for a limited period)

Related: Designing a High-Performing Health Care System for Patients with Complex Needs: Ten Recommendations for Policymakers – The Commonwealth fund (free) AND Effective Care for High-Need Patients: Opportunities for Improving Outcomes, Value, and Health – National Academy of Medicine (free PDF) AND Focusing on High-Cost Patients — The Key to Addressing High Costs? – NEJM Catalyst (free) AND  Systematic review of high-cost patients’ characteristics and healthcare utilization – BMJ Open (free) AND Effectiveness of interventions for managing multiple high-burden chronic diseases in older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis – Canadian Medical Association Journal (free) AND Multimorbidity: a priority for global health research – The Academy of Medical Sciences (free) AND The global burden of multiple chronic conditions: A narrative review – Preventive Medicine Reports (free) AND Redesigning Care for High-Cost, High-Risk Patients – Harvard Business Review (a few articles per month are free) AND Multimorbidity: clinical assessment and management – NICE Guideline (free) AND Multimorbidity in Older Adults with Cardiovascular Disease – American College of Cardiology, Latest in Cardiology (free) AND  Richard Smith: The challenge of high need, high cost patients – The BMJ Blogs (free) AND Playbook: Better Care for People with Complex Needs – Institute for Healthcare Improvement (free)

 


NCCN Guideline: Distress Management

10 Oct, 2019 | 09:06h | UTC

I’ve noticed a change in my colleague’s behaviour. What should I do? – The BMJ (free) (via @brhospitalist)

 

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World Health Organization Campaign on World Patient Safety Day (free resources)

News Release: WHO calls for urgent action to reduce patient harm in healthcare (free)

See also: Patient Safety Fact Sheet (free) 10 facts on patient safety (free) AND The Lancet Editorial: Patient safety: too little, but not too late (free)

 

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How to start an antimicrobial stewardship programme in a hospital – Clinical Microbiology and Infection (free)

 

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Key Concepts for Making Informed Choices

15 Aug, 2019 | 07:47h | UTC

Too Much Medicine: Not Enough trust?

11 Aug, 2019 | 22:18h | UTC

Too Much Medicine: Not Enough trust? – Journal of Medical Ethics (free)

 

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Prevalence, severity, and nature of preventable patient harm across medical care settings: systematic review and meta-analysis – The BMJ (free)

Editorial: Preventable harm: getting the measure right (free)

Commentaries: One in 20 patients exposed to preventable harm in medical care – OnMedica (free) AND Half of All Patient Harms ‘Preventable’ – Medscape (free registration required)

 

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Effect of Flexible Family Visitation on Delirium Among Patients in the Intensive Care Unit: The ICU Visits Randomized Clinical Trial – JAMA (free for a limited period)

Editorial: Psychological Consequences of Admission to the ICU: Helping Patients and Families (free for a limited period)

Author Interview: Do Flexible Family Visitation Hours Reduce Delirium in ICU Patients? – MedicalResearch.com (free)

 

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For the sake of doctors and patients, we must fix hospital culture – The BMJ Opinion (free)

Related: Speaking up to prevent harm: A systematic review of the safety voice literature – Safety Science (free)

“When hospitals fail to create a culture where doctors and nurses can speak up patients pay the price.”

 


Use of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Patients With Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease: A Prospective Cohort Study – Annals of Internal Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: Peripherally inserted central catheters often used in CKD – HealthDay (free) AND Too Many CKD Patients Get Central Catheters Despite Warnings – Medscape (free registration required)

 

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An Implementation Guide to Promote Sleep and Reduce Sedative-Hypnotic Initiation for Noncritically Ill Inpatients – JAMA Internal Medicine (free for a limited period)

 

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Is It Time for Safeguards in the Adoption of Robotic Surgery? – JAMA (free for a limited period)

Related: FDA Cautions Patients, Providers About Using Robotically-assisted Surgical Devices for Mastectomy and Other Cancer-related Surgeries (free safety alert and commentary)

“To date, most studies demonstrating potential benefits of robotic-assisted surgery have been small, single-centered reports without rigorous controls.”

 


Why you should be a “medical conservative” – Lown Institute (free)

Original Article: Perspective: The Case for Being a Medical Conservative (free article and twitter thread)

“being a medical conservative means being skeptical about new medical advances until unbiased and high-quality evidence shows a clear benefit”

 


Evaluation of the Collaborative Use of an Evidence-Based Care Bundle in Emergency Laparotomy – JAMA Surgery (free)

 

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Bundled Payments Are Moving Upstream – NEJM Catalyst (free)

“For bundled payments to fulfill their promise of delivering greater value to patients, bundling must shift toward the condition or person level rather than the procedure level”

 


Association of Overlapping Surgery With Perioperative Outcomes – JAMA (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Podcast: Is It Safe? What Happens When Your Surgeon Is Not Actually Doing Some of Your Operation? – JAMA (free)

Commentaries: How Safe Are Overlapping Surgeries? – Harvard Medical School (free) AND Double-Booked Surgeons: Study Raises Safety Questions For High-Risk Patients – NPR (free) AND ‘Overlapping surgery’ is safe for most patients, but not all – STAT (free)

 

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Humanizing the intensive care unit – Critical Care (free)

 

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PSA’s Medicine Safety: Take Care – Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (free PDF)

News Release: Problems with medicines behind 250,000 hospital admissions annually (free)

“The report reveals that 250,000 Australians are hospitalised each year, with another 400,000 presenting to emergency departments, as a result of medication errors, inappropriate use, misadventure and interactions. At least half of this could have been prevented.”

 


Patient-reported complications related to peripherally inserted central catheters: a multicentre prospective cohort study – BMJ Quality & Safety (free)

 

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Performing an Inadvertent Procedure – JAMA (free for a limited period)

 


Effectiveness of SIESTA on Objective and Subjective Metrics of Nighttime Hospital Sleep Disruptors – Journal of Hospital Medicine (free)

Commentary: Hospital SIESTA project reduces inpatient sleep interruptions – University of Chicago Medical Center (free)

 

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Update: Patient Engagement in Safety

10 Jan, 2019 | 21:28h | UTC

International variation in radiation dose for computed tomography examinations: prospective cohort study – The BMJ (free)

 

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Why Hospitals Should Let You Sleep – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

“Frequent disruptions are more than just annoying for patients. They can also cause harm.”

 


Investigation: The Implant Files

30 Nov, 2018 | 02:01h | UTC

Perspective: What the Tests Don’t Show

11 Oct, 2018 | 20:11h | UTC

What the tests don’t show – The Washington Post (a few articles per month are free)

“Many doctors are surprisingly bad at reading test results and/or fail to grasp how false positives work. This is putting patients at risk” (via @pash22 see Tweet)

 


Association between physician US News & World Report medical school ranking and patient outcomes and costs of care: observational study – The BMJ (free)

“Overall, little or no relation was found between the USNWR ranking of the medical school from which a physician graduated and subsequent patient mortality or readmission rates.”

 


Perspective: Good Documentation

6 Sep, 2018 | 02:52h | UTC

Good Documentation – JAMA (free for a limited period)

“In this narrative medicine essay, the author, who transitioned from paper and pen to computer-generated electronic health record keeping wonders whether the self-select menu items ultimately dehumanizes both the patient and the physician.” (via @JAMA_current see Tweet)

 


Abraar Karan: Changing the way we communicate about patients – The BMJ Opinion (free) (via @NUNESDOC)

“Father of 2, retired car salesman and keen on football NOT the colon cancer in Bed 4 – social history brings humanity back to the bedside” (via @hospicedoctor see Tweet)

 


Report: Improving Health Care Worldwide

31 Aug, 2018 | 02:09h | UTC

Using a New EHR System to Increase Patient Engagement, Improve Efficiency, and Decrease Cost – NEJM Catalyst (free)

“Another solution might be to capitalize on patients’ vested interest in their own health care by actively engaging them in the entry of their own medical history information into the EHR.”

 


Opinion: Lessons for physicians from ‘The Bleeding Edge’: If you see something, say something – STAT (free)

“…physicians must act decisively when they identify the rare outlier in their midst. To do anything less would risk our credibility. Worse still, it could risk the lives of the people we took an oath not to harm.”

 


A Multicenter Study of Patient-Reported Infectious and Noninfectious Complications Associated With Indwelling Urethral Catheters – JAMA Internal Medicine (free)

Commentary: Foleys Aren’t Fun: Patient Study Shows Catheter Risks – University of Michigan, via NewsWise (free)

“More than half of patients surveyed while they had a urinary catheter, and again weeks later, reported a complication – and infections were only part of the problem” (from NewsWise)

 


Out-of-hours discharge from intensive care, in-hospital mortality and intensive care readmission rates: a systematic review and meta-analysis – Intensive Care Medicine (free)

Source: Critical Care Reviews Newsletter

“Out-of-hours discharge from an ICU is strongly associated with both in-hospital death and ICU readmission. Whether these increases in mortality and readmission result from patient differences, differences in care, or a combination remains unclear”.

 


A sleep prescription for medicine – The Lancet (free registration required)

“Junior doctors working a 34 h shift will make 460% more diagnostic mistakes than when well rested. Matthew Walker asks how can we change the culture of sleep within medicine?” (via @TheLancet see Tweet)