Patient Safety & Quality

Humanizing the intensive care unit – Critical Care (free)

 

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PSA’s Medicine Safety: Take Care – Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (free PDF)

News Release: Problems with medicines behind 250,000 hospital admissions annually (free)

“The report reveals that 250,000 Australians are hospitalised each year, with another 400,000 presenting to emergency departments, as a result of medication errors, inappropriate use, misadventure and interactions. At least half of this could have been prevented.”

 


Patient-reported complications related to peripherally inserted central catheters: a multicentre prospective cohort study – BMJ Quality & Safety (free)

 

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Performing an Inadvertent Procedure – JAMA (free for a limited period)

 


Effectiveness of SIESTA on Objective and Subjective Metrics of Nighttime Hospital Sleep Disruptors – Journal of Hospital Medicine (free)

Commentary: Hospital SIESTA project reduces inpatient sleep interruptions – University of Chicago Medical Center (free)

 

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Update: Patient Engagement in Safety

10 Jan, 2019 | 21:28h | UTC

International variation in radiation dose for computed tomography examinations: prospective cohort study – The BMJ (free)

 

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Why Hospitals Should Let You Sleep – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

“Frequent disruptions are more than just annoying for patients. They can also cause harm.”

 


Investigation: The Implant Files

30 Nov, 2018 | 02:01h | UTC

Perspective: What the Tests Don’t Show

11 Oct, 2018 | 20:11h | UTC

What the tests don’t show – The Washington Post (a few articles per month are free)

“Many doctors are surprisingly bad at reading test results and/or fail to grasp how false positives work. This is putting patients at risk” (via @pash22 see Tweet)

 


Association between physician US News & World Report medical school ranking and patient outcomes and costs of care: observational study – The BMJ (free)

“Overall, little or no relation was found between the USNWR ranking of the medical school from which a physician graduated and subsequent patient mortality or readmission rates.”

 


Perspective: Good Documentation

6 Sep, 2018 | 02:52h | UTC

Good Documentation – JAMA (free for a limited period)

“In this narrative medicine essay, the author, who transitioned from paper and pen to computer-generated electronic health record keeping wonders whether the self-select menu items ultimately dehumanizes both the patient and the physician.” (via @JAMA_current see Tweet)

 


Abraar Karan: Changing the way we communicate about patients – The BMJ Opinion (free) (via @NUNESDOC)

“Father of 2, retired car salesman and keen on football NOT the colon cancer in Bed 4 – social history brings humanity back to the bedside” (via @hospicedoctor see Tweet)

 


Report: Improving Health Care Worldwide

31 Aug, 2018 | 02:09h | UTC

Using a New EHR System to Increase Patient Engagement, Improve Efficiency, and Decrease Cost – NEJM Catalyst (free)

“Another solution might be to capitalize on patients’ vested interest in their own health care by actively engaging them in the entry of their own medical history information into the EHR.”

 


Opinion: Lessons for physicians from ‘The Bleeding Edge’: If you see something, say something – STAT (free)

“…physicians must act decisively when they identify the rare outlier in their midst. To do anything less would risk our credibility. Worse still, it could risk the lives of the people we took an oath not to harm.”

 


A Multicenter Study of Patient-Reported Infectious and Noninfectious Complications Associated With Indwelling Urethral Catheters – JAMA Internal Medicine (free)

Commentary: Foleys Aren’t Fun: Patient Study Shows Catheter Risks – University of Michigan, via NewsWise (free)

“More than half of patients surveyed while they had a urinary catheter, and again weeks later, reported a complication – and infections were only part of the problem” (from NewsWise)

 


Out-of-hours discharge from intensive care, in-hospital mortality and intensive care readmission rates: a systematic review and meta-analysis – Intensive Care Medicine (free)

Source: Critical Care Reviews Newsletter

“Out-of-hours discharge from an ICU is strongly associated with both in-hospital death and ICU readmission. Whether these increases in mortality and readmission result from patient differences, differences in care, or a combination remains unclear”.

 


A sleep prescription for medicine – The Lancet (free registration required)

“Junior doctors working a 34 h shift will make 460% more diagnostic mistakes than when well rested. Matthew Walker asks how can we change the culture of sleep within medicine?” (via @TheLancet see Tweet)

 


Rapid Recommendations: Atraumatic (pencil-point) versus conventional needles for lumbar puncture: a clinical practice guideline – The BMJ (free)

We issue a strong recommendation for use of atraumatic needles in all patients (adults and children) undergoing lumbar puncture because they decrease complications and are no less likely to work than conventional needles”

 


Trying to Put a Value on the Doctor-Patient Relationship – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

“In its push for profits, the U.S. health care system has made it difficult for patients to get personal attention from doctors. But what if hands-on medicine actually saves money — and lives?”

 


WHO Campaign: Clean Your Hands

10 May, 2018 | 17:34h | UTC

SAVE LIVES: Clean Your Hands 5 May 2018 – World Health Organization Campaign (free guidelines, implementation tools, infographics, videos and more)

“It’s in your hands – prevent sepsis in health care”

 



A prescription for medication errors

30 Mar, 2018 | 02:44h | UTC

New Guide to Infection Control in The Hospital – International Society for Infectious Diseases (free)

A free, online resource on the principles and interventions needed to reduce healthcare associated infections, with suggested control measures across different resource levels.

 


Opioid Wisely – Choosing Wisely Canada (free)

Related Guideline: Guideline for opioid therapy and chronic noncancer pain – Canadian Medical Association Journal (free)

See complete lists from Choosing Wisely U.S. / Choosing Wisely UKChoosing Wisely Australia AND Choosing Wisely Canada

This campaign encourages thoughtful conversation between clinicians and patients to reduce harms associated with opioid prescribing, with recommendations relevant to different specialties.

 


Patterns and Predictors of Short-Term Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Use: A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study – Journal of Hospital Medicine (free PDF)

Commentary: Short-term use of IV devices is common — and risky — study shows – University of Michigan, via ScienceDaily (free)

“Intravenous devices known as PICCs should be reserved for long-term use, but a new study shows 1 in 4 are used for 5 days or less” (from ScienceDaily)

 


Compassionate leadership has a pivotal role in tackling bullying in healthcare – The BMJ Opinion (free)

“Negative staff experiences are often a precursor for negative patient experiences”.

 


Editor’s Choice: There but for the grace of God . . . – The BMJ (free)

About liability and error in medical practice.

 


E-learning for health professionals – Cochrane Library (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

 


Weekend Surgical Care and Postoperative Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies (free)

Commentary: Evidence Supports ‘Weekend Effect’ for Mortality after Surgery – Wolters Kluwer, via NewsWise (free)

“The odds of postoperative mortality were 27 percent higher for patients admitted to the hospital on Saturday or Sunday, compared to those hospitalized on a weekday” (from NewsWise).

 


Identifying older adults at risk of harm following elective surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis – BMC Medicine (free)

Commentary : Age itself is not a risk factor for complications after surgery among older patients – OnMedica (free)

“Q: What predicts poor outcome after elective surgery in older people?

A: Frailty, cognitive impairment, depression, smoking but NOT age per se”. (via @trishgreenhalgh see Tweet)

 


Can Your Hip Replacement Kill You?

16 Jan, 2018 | 19:09h | UTC

Can Your Hip Replacement Kill You? – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

“Lawsuits are pulling back the curtain on what some doctors call the Wild West of medicine: the untested and largely unregulated medical device industry” (via @NYTHealth see Tweet)

 


What Physicians Can do About Ransomware

16 Jan, 2018 | 17:04h | UTC

What physicians can do about ransomware – ACP Hospitalist (free)

“Protecting a practice doesn’t always require a large investment of money, just time and employee training”.

 


Meta-analysis of Interventions to Reduce Adverse Drug Reactions in Older Adults – Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

“Interventions designed to optimize medication use reduced the risk of any and serious ADRs in older adults. Implementation of these successful interventions in healthcare systems may improve medication safety in older adults”.

 


Why American doctors keep doing expensive procedures that don’t work – VOX (free)

“The proportion of medical procedures unsupported by evidence may be nearly half”.

 


The struggle to do no harm in clinical trials – Nature (free)

“The struggle to do no harm: the unexplained deaths in #cancer immunotherapy trials” (via @EricTopol see Tweet)