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NEWS - Nutrition

A time to fast – Science (free for a limited period) (via @EricTopol)

 


Early enteral nutrition within 24 hours of lower gastrointestinal surgery versus later commencement for length of hospital stay and postoperative complications – Cochrane Library (free)

Summary: The effect of having nutrition within the first 24 hours after bowel surgery on length of hospital stay and postoperative complications – Cochrane Library (free)

This review suggests that early enteral feeding is associated with a shorter length of hospital stay. For all other outcomes (postoperative complications, mortality, adverse events, and QoL) the findings are inconclusive.

 


The Problem With Probiotics – The New York Times (free)

Related: Probiotic Safety—No Guarantees (free perspective)

“There are potential harms as well as benefits, and a lot of wishful thinking and imprecision in the marketing of products containing them.”

 


Energy-Dense versus Routine Enteral Nutrition in the Critically Ill – New England Journal of Medicine (free for a limited period)

Energy-dense formulation for enteral delivery of nutrition was not associated with better outcomes.

 


Dietary modifications for infantile colic – Cochrane Library (free)

Summary: Diet changes for infant colic – Cochrane Library (free)

“Based on available evidence, we are unable to recommend any intervention”

 


Modifying the consistency of food and fluids for swallowing difficulties in dementia – Cochrane Library (free for a limited period)

Summary: Modifying the consistency of food and fluids for swallowing difficulties in dementia (free)

“We are uncertain about the immediate and long-term effects of modifying the consistency of fluid for swallowing difficulties in dementia”

 


Healthy dietary indices and risk of depressive outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies – Molecular Psychiatry (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: Plant-rich diets may help prevent depression – new evidence – The Conversation (free) AND Eating a Mediterranean diet ‘may lower your risk of depression’ – NHS Choices (free) AND Expert reaction to observational studies on diet and depression – Science Media Centre (free) AND Mediterranean diet could prevent depression, new study finds – CNN (free)

“The current evidence is not sufficient to prove plant-rich diets can prevent depression as most of the evidence so far simply shows that those with poorer mental health eat worse, so it may be that those more prone to depression also choose less health” (from CNN)

 


Association between maternal gluten intake and type 1 diabetes in offspring: national prospective cohort study in Denmark – The BMJ (free)

Editorial: Dietary gluten and type 1 diabetes (free for a limited period)

Commentaries: Expert reaction to research on high gluten intake during pregnancy and type 1 diabetes in children – Science Media Centre (free) AND Higher Gluten Intake in Pregnancy Tied to Increased Diabetes Risk in Offspring – Physician’s First Watch (free) AND High gluten intake during pregnancy associated with diabetes – OnMedica (free)’

“As such these results, whilst well executed and very interesting, would need to be confirmed within independent similarly sized or bigger studies as stated by the authors themselves.” (from Science Media Centre)

 


Association of dairy intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality in 21 countries from five continents (PURE): a prospective cohort study – The Lancet (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: The Lancet: Dairy consumption linked to lower rates of cardiovascular disease and mortality – EurekAlert (free) AND Dairy food in moderation ‘may protect the heart’ – The Guardian (free) AND Is Whole-Fat Dairy Good for the Heart? – New York Times (free)

Related: Meta-Analysis: Cheese consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease (link to abstract and commentaries) AND Milk and dairy consumption and risk of cardiovascular diseases and all-cause mortality (free study and commentaries)

“It is not the ultimate seal of approval for recommending whole-fat dairy over its low-fat or skimmed counterparts. Readers should be cautious, and treat this study only as yet another piece of the evidence (albeit a large one) in the literature.”

 


Alcohol use and burden for 195 countries and territories, 1990–2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 – The Lancet (free)

Commentaries: No level of alcohol consumption improves health – The Lancet (free) AND No amount of alcohol is good for your overall health, global study says – CNN (free) AND New scientific study: no safe level of alcohol – Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (free)

“Alcohol was responsible for nearly 3 million deaths in 2016, the study says. It was the leading risk factor for disease and premature death in men and women between the ages of 15 and 49 worldwide in 2016, accounting for nearly one in 10 deaths.” (from @cnni see Tweet)

 


The Challenge of Reforming Nutritional Epidemiologic Research – JAMA (free for a limited period)

“…the emerging picture of nutritional epidemiology is difficult to reconcile with good scientific principles. The field needs radical reform.”

 


ESPGHAN/ESPEN/ESPR guidelines on pediatric parenteral nutrition – Clinical Nutrition:

Complications

Energy

Iron and trace minerals

Calcium, phosphorus and magnesium

Amino acids

Carbohydrates

Lipids

Venous access

 


The right diet can boost potency of cancer drugs – Nature News (free)

Original article: Suppression of insulin feedback enhances the efficacy of PI3K inhibitors – Nature (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Related: Top oncologist to study effect of diet on cancer drugs – The Guardian (free)

“Diets appear to matter in mouse cancer Rx – can these preclinical findings be translated to humans?” (via @Aiims1742 see Tweet)

 


Seriously, Juice Is Not Healthy – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

“Would you take a multivitamin if it contained 10 teaspoons of sugar? No. Then why are you drinking juice?” (via @NYTHealth see Tweet)

 


This Mediterranean diet study was hugely impactful. The science just fell apart – VOX (free)

See Related Retraction and Republication: PREDIMED Study on Mediterranean Diet (free article and commentaries)

 


The association between food insecurity and incident type 2 diabetes in Canada: A population-based cohort study – PLOS One (free)

Commentary: Food insecurity linked to type 2 diabetes risk – Reuters (free)

“Canadians who cannot afford to eat regularly or to eat a healthy diet have more than double the average risk of developing type 2 diabetes” (from Reuters)

 


Call for public comments on the draft WHO Guidelines: Saturated fatty acid and trans-fatty intake for adults and children – World Health Organization (free)

Commentaries: Eat less saturated, trans fats to curb heart disease: WHO – Reuters (free) AND Eat Less Saturated and Trans Fats, World Health Organization Says – Consumer Reports (free) AND ‘Bad’ fats targeted in new global health guidelines – UN News (free)

“Adults and children should consume a maximum of 10 percent of their daily calories in the form of saturated fat such as meat and butter and one percent from trans fats to reduce the risk of heart disease, the World Health Organization said on Friday” (from Reuters)

 


Report: Using dietary intake modelling to achieve population salt reduction – A guide to developing a country-specific salt reduction model (2018) – WHO Europe (free PDF)

“The Salt Reduction Model is a 5-step plan to help countries achieve a 30% reduction in population salt intake. Reducing salt consumption will help prevent and control noncommunicable diseases such as heart disease and stroke” (via @WHO_Europe see Tweet)

 


Editorial: Mushrooms: coming soon to a burger near you – Nature News (free)

“Mushroom–beef blends can tackle expanding waistlines and carbon footprints”.

 


The dark truth about chocolate – The Guardian (free)

Related: Dark chocolate is now a health food. Here’s how that happened – VOX (free)

“Grand health claims have been made about chocolate, but while it gives us pleasure, can it really be good for us?”

 


What We Know (and Don’t Know) About How to Lose Weight – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

“One conclusion from a much-discussed study: The best diet is the one you can stick to”.

 


Effect of dietary carbohydrate restriction on glycemic control in adults with diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis – Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

“Carbohydrate-restricted diets, associated with reductions in HbA1c of around 0.4% in short term” (via @kamleshkhunti see Tweet)

 


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