Neurology

Global, regional, and national burden of multiple sclerosis 1990–2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 – The Lancet Neurology (free)

Invited Commentary: A global perspective on the burden of multiple sclerosis (free)

 

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Chronic pain as a symptom or a disease: The IASP Classification of Chronic Pain for the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) – Pain (free)

Commentary: IASP Updates Classification of Chronic Pain – Clinical Advisor (free)

 

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Guideline: Cerebral Palsy in Adults

16 Jan, 2019 | 00:37h | UTC

Vitamin and mineral supplementation for maintaining cognitive function in cognitively healthy people in mid and late life – Cochrane Library (free)

Summary: Vitamin and mineral supplementation for preventing cognitive deterioration in cognitively healthy people in mid and late life – Cochrane Library (free)

Commentary: Preventing dementia: do vitamin and mineral supplements have a role? – Evidently Cochrane (free)

 

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Global, Regional, and Country-Specific Lifetime Risks of Stroke, 1990 and 2016 – New England Journal of Medicine (free)

Commentaries: New study reveals ‘startling’ risk of stroke – Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (free) AND 1 in 4 globally will have a stroke at age 25 or older, according to new study – CNN (free)

 

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Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel for acute high risk transient ischaemic attack and minor ischaemic stroke – The BMJ (free)

Commentary: Guidelines Recommend Dual Antiplatelet Therapy Immediately After TIA or Minor Stroke NEJM Journal Watch (free)

 

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Global, regional, and national burden of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, 1990–2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 – The Lancet Neurology (free)

Invited Commentary: Statistics on the burden of dementia: need for stronger data – The Lancet (free)

“In 2016, globally, 43·8 million individuals lived with dementia, increased from 20.2 million in 1990; dementia was the fifth leading cause of death globally (2·4 million) and more women than men had dementia” (via @TheLancet see Tweet with infographic)

 


Review: Intracranial Aneurysms

18 Nov, 2018 | 00:14h | UTC

Review: Neuroinfections Caused by Fungi

16 Nov, 2018 | 02:51h | UTC

Antipsychotic drug use and pneumonia: Systematic review and meta-analysis – Journal of Psychopharmacology (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentary: Antipsychotics May Increase Risk of Pneumonia, Meta-Analysis Suggests – Psychiatric News Alert (free)

“Although antipsychotic use was associated with a higher risk of pneumonia, the researchers stopped short of claiming causality, citing a lack of data from randomized, controlled trials and a failure of observational studies to control for relevant confounders like tobacco use and weight.” (from Psychiatric News Alert)

 


Podcast: Headaches Advanced Class

2 Nov, 2018 | 02:49h | UTC

Global, regional, and national burden of Parkinson’s disease, 1990–2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 – The Lancet Neurology (free)

Invited Commentary: The burden of Parkinson’s disease: a worldwide perspective (free)

“In 2016, 6·1 million people worldwide had Parkinson’s disease, 2·9 million (48%) women & 3·2 million (52%) men; the increase in burden since 1990 was not exclusively explained by an increasing number of older people” (via @TheLancet see Tweet)

 


Modifying the consistency of food and fluids for swallowing difficulties in dementia – Cochrane Library (free for a limited period)

Summary: Modifying the consistency of food and fluids for swallowing difficulties in dementia (free)

“We are uncertain about the immediate and long-term effects of modifying the consistency of fluid for swallowing difficulties in dementia”

 


Podcast: Geriatric Depression

27 Sep, 2018 | 22:45h | UTC

Antidepressants for treating depression in dementia – Cochrane Library (free for a limited period)

Summary: Antidepressants for treating depression in dementia – Cochrane Library (free)

“On the only measure of efficacy for which we had high-quality evidence (depression rating scale scores), antidepressants showed little or no effect.”

 


Breastfeeding History and Risk of Stroke Among Parous Postmenopausal Women in the Women’s Health Initiative – Journal of the American Heart Association (free)

Commentaries: Breastfeeding linked to lower stroke risk – Reuters (free) AND Breastfeeding may help protect mothers against stroke – AHA News (free)

“…ultimately, the study is observational, which means that it can only prove that breast feeding is associated with lower risk of stroke as opposed to being the cause of the lowered risk.” (from Reuters)

 


Guideline: Acute Stroke Management

26 Jul, 2018 | 18:09h | UTC

Review: Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis

26 Jul, 2018 | 17:43h | UTC

Association of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thinning With Current and Future Cognitive Decline: A Study Using Optical Coherence Tomography – JAMA Neurology (free for a limited period)

Commentaries: Eye Sign of Dementia Risk? Thinning of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer – MedicalResearch.com (free) AND Are the Eyes Windows to Early Dementia? – MedPage Today (free registration required)

“A thinner Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer is associated with worse cognitive function in individuals without a neurodegenerative disease as well as greater likelihood of future cognitive decline”.

 


NICE Guideline: Dementia

22 Jun, 2018 | 02:34h | UTC

Association of Antidepressant Use With Drug-Related Extrapyramidal Symptoms: A Pharmacoepidemiological Study – Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: Incidence of Extrapyramidal Symptoms Higher With Certain Antidepressants – MPR (free) AND Antidepressants tied to Parkinson’s-like symptoms – Univadis (free registration required)

“Observational study: Incidence of EPSs with antidepressants. RRs: duloxetine, 5.68; mirtazapine, 3.78; citalopram, 3.47; escitalopram, 3.23; paroxetine, 3.07; sertraline, 2.57; venlafaxine, 2.37; bupropion, 2.31; and fluoxetine, 2.03 (all significant)” (via @psychopharmacol see Tweet)

 


Practice guideline update summary: Efficacy and tolerability of the new antiepileptic drugs – American Academy of Neurology and the American Epilepsy Society

Part I: Treatment of new-onset epilepsy (free PDF)

Part II: Treatment-resistant epilepsy (free PDF)

Commentary: New Epilepsy Guidelines Shed Light on Explosion of New Drugs – MedPage Today (free registration required)

 


Continuous low-dose antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent urinary tract infection in adults who perform clean intermittent self-catheterisation: the AnTIC RCT – Health Technology Assessment (free)

“The results of this large randomised trial, conducted in accordance with best practice, demonstrate clear benefit for antibiotic prophylaxis in terms of reducing the frequency of UTI for people carrying out CISC”.

 


Review: Perimesencephalic Hemorrhage

6 Jun, 2018 | 21:35h | UTC

Effect of Fremanezumab Compared With Placebo for Prevention of Episodic Migraine: A Randomized Clinical Trial – JAMA (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentary: Fremanezumab effective in preventing episodic migraine – 2 Minute Medicine (free)

“Among patients with episodic migraine in whom multiple medication classes had not previously failed, subcutaneous fremanezumab, compared with placebo, resulted in a statistically significant 1.3- to 1.5-day reduction in the mean number of monthly migraine days over a 12-week period”. (from JAMA)

“The small effect size in terms of reduction in number of days with migraine dampens enthusiasm for this medication, though without head-to-head comparison against other prophylactics, this is hard to assess” (from 2 Minute Medicine)

 


Rapid Recommendations: Atraumatic (pencil-point) versus conventional needles for lumbar puncture: a clinical practice guideline – The BMJ (free)

We issue a strong recommendation for use of atraumatic needles in all patients (adults and children) undergoing lumbar puncture because they decrease complications and are no less likely to work than conventional needles”