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NEWS - General Interest

Why Hospitals Should Let You Sleep – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

“Frequent disruptions are more than just annoying for patients. They can also cause harm.”

 


Medical Screening Tests You Do and Don’t Need – Consumer Reports (free) (via @EricTopol)

“Some may be life-saving, but others can waste time and money—and pose risks”

 


Assessment of Pregabalin Postapproval Trials and the Suggestion of Efficacy for New Indications: A Systematic Review – JAMA Internal Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentary: Some research may be encouraging ineffective prescriptions, says new study – McGill University (free)

“Our point is not to condemn these individual trials. Instead, we are saying that—when you zoom out and look at what’s happening at the level of the forest—the trees begin to look less healthy.” (from McGill University)

 


Abraar Karan: Has the physical exam had its day? – The BMJ Opinion (free)

“Seeing patients in clinic today, I know that putting my stethoscope on them has a therapeutic effect, even if as their doctor, I am quite certain their heart and lungs are normal. However, this doesn’t mean the physical exam should not evolve.” (via @AbraarKaran see Tweet)

 


A time to fast – Science (free for a limited period) (via @EricTopol)

 


Why Doctors Hate Their Computers – The New Yorker (free)

“Digitization promises to make medical care easier and more efficient. But are screens coming between doctors and patients?”

 


A Profusion of Diagnoses. That’s Good and Bad – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

“…we may also be medicalizing much of normal human behavior — labeling the healthy as diseased, and exposing them to undue risk of stigma, testing and treatment.”

 



The Problem With Probiotics – The New York Times (free)

Related: Probiotic Safety—No Guarantees (free perspective)

“There are potential harms as well as benefits, and a lot of wishful thinking and imprecision in the marketing of products containing them.”

 


Heart disease used to be an ailment of the rich. But it’s now striking the world’s poor. – VOX (free)

“In 2016, an estimated 1 million people died of HIV/AIDS, 445,000 people died of malaria, and 1.7 million died of tuberculosis. Nearly 18 million died of heart disease. And more than three-quarters of those deaths occurred in the developing world.”

 


Professional Societies Should Abstain From Authorship of Guidelines and Disease Definition Statements – Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes (free)

Commentaries: Professional Societies, Clinical Specialists, and Guidelines – Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes (free) AND Turn Cardiology Guidelines Over to Outsiders – MedPage Today (free registration required)

John Ioannidis, MD. “questioned whether cardiovascular guidelines “homogenize biased, collective, and organized ignorance” through use of predominantly “insider” experts as authors.” (from MedPage Today)

 


Should You Have Knee Replacement Surgery? – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

“Some experts question whether the surgery is being done too often or too soon on patients who have not adequately explored less invasive approaches.”

 


Antibiotics May Soon Become Useless. Now What? – WIRED (a few articles per month are free)

 


The approach to predictive medicine that is taking genomics research by storm – Nature (free)

“Polygenic risk scores represent a giant leap for gene-based diagnostic tests. Here’s why they’re still so controversial.”

 


800,000 people kill themselves every year. What can we do? – The Guardian (free) (via @onisillos)

Related Guidelines: Preventing suicide: A community engagement toolkit – World Health Organization (free PDF) AND Preventing suicide in community and custodial settings – National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (free)

“In too many places mental health support services are non-existent and those with treatable conditions are criminalized. Bold action is long overdue”

 


The Name of the Dog – New England Journal of Medicine (free)

“During morning rounds, I had presented a patient who was admitted for chest pain after walking his dog. My attending had asked, ‘What was the name of his dog?’ ” (via @fischmd see Tweet)

 


What the tests don’t show – The Washington Post (a few articles per month are free)

“Many doctors are surprisingly bad at reading test results and/or fail to grasp how false positives work. This is putting patients at risk” (via @pash22 see Tweet)

 


Given Their Potential for Harm, It’s Time to Focus on the Safety of Supplements – JAMA (free for a limited period) (via @NUNESDOC)

“About 23 000 visits to emergency departments each year can be attributed to adverse events from dietary supplements.”

 


When Conventional Wisdom Is Put on Trial – UNDark (free) (via @EricTopol)

“The author of “Randomistas” shows how randomized trials have overturned many popular findings, from hormone therapy to the benefits of multivitamins.”

 


Associations between 24 hour movement behaviours and global cognition in US children: a cross-sectional observational study – The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: Limiting children’s recreational screen time to less than 2 hours a day linked to better cognition – The Lancet (free) AND Limiting children’s screen time linked to better cognition, study says – CNN (free) AND Limiting children’s screen time linked to better cognition – BBC (free)

“Researchers said more work was now needed to better understand the effects of different types of screen use. However, they acknowledge that their observational study shows only an association between screen time and cognition and cannot prove a causal link.” (from BBC)

 


No more first authors, no more last authors – Nature (free)

“The controversial suggestion that we “blow up” authorship conventions to foster team, collaborative science” (via @EricTopol see Tweet)

 


Association between physician US News & World Report medical school ranking and patient outcomes and costs of care: observational study – The BMJ (free)

“Overall, little or no relation was found between the USNWR ranking of the medical school from which a physician graduated and subsequent patient mortality or readmission rates.”

 


Healthy dietary indices and risk of depressive outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies – Molecular Psychiatry (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: Plant-rich diets may help prevent depression – new evidence – The Conversation (free) AND Eating a Mediterranean diet ‘may lower your risk of depression’ – NHS Choices (free) AND Expert reaction to observational studies on diet and depression – Science Media Centre (free) AND Mediterranean diet could prevent depression, new study finds – CNN (free)

“The current evidence is not sufficient to prove plant-rich diets can prevent depression as most of the evidence so far simply shows that those with poorer mental health eat worse, so it may be that those more prone to depression also choose less health” (from CNN)

 


Congratulations. Your Study Went Nowhere – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free) (via @kennylinafp)

“Researchers should embrace negative results instead of accentuating the positive, which is one of several biases that can lead to bad science.”

 


The Case For Expensive Antibiotics – WIRED (a few articles per month are free) (via @CarlosdelRio7)

 


Everything You Know About Obesity Is Wrong – HuffPost (free) (via @cardiobrief)

“For decades, the medical community has ignored mountains of evidence to wage a cruel and futile war on fat people, poisoning public perception and ruining millions of lives.”

 


Are We Being Misled About Precision Medicine? – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

“Doctors and hospitals love to talk about the cancer patients they’ve saved, and reporters love to write about them. But deaths still vastly outnumber the rare successes.”

 


Screening: How overdiagnosis and other harms can undermine the benefits – Health News Review (free)

“All screening programs do harm, some do good as well.”

 


The Moral Dilemma of Learning Medicine from the Poor – The Doctors Weight In (free) (via @kennylinafp)

“I learned good skills because I was allowed to practice on people who had no other option.”

 


Good Documentation – JAMA (free for a limited period)

“In this narrative medicine essay, the author, who transitioned from paper and pen to computer-generated electronic health record keeping wonders whether the self-select menu items ultimately dehumanizes both the patient and the physician.” (via @JAMA_current see Tweet)

 


Abraar Karan: Changing the way we communicate about patients – The BMJ Opinion (free) (via @NUNESDOC)

“Father of 2, retired car salesman and keen on football NOT the colon cancer in Bed 4 – social history brings humanity back to the bedside” (via @hospicedoctor see Tweet)

 


Did Juul Lure Teenagers and Get ‘Customers for Life’? – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

“…will it be possible to get people who are addicted to cigarettes to switch to e-cigarettes, which are less harmful, without enticing a new generation or non-smokers to try them?” (via @CaulfieldTim see Tweet)

 


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