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NEWS - Gastroenterology

Pantoprazole in Patients at Risk for Gastrointestinal Bleeding in the ICU – New England Journal of Medicine (free for a limited period)

Editorial: Proton-Pump Inhibitor Prophylaxis in the ICU — Benefits Worth the Risks? (free for a limited period)

“Proton pump inhibitors are minimally effective to reduce GI bleeding among the critically ill folks at high risk for stress ulcers. Takeaways: no role for routine PPI for any patients on the WARDS, and shouldn’t be considered ‘routine’ in the ICU” (via @AnilMakam see Tweet)

 


Probiotic Safety—No Guarantees – JAMA Internal Medicine (free for a limited period)

Related: Probiotics: Does the Evidence Match the Hype? (free articles and commentaries) AND Systematic Review: Harms Reporting in Trials with Probiotics (link to abstract and commentaries)

 


Rotavirus Vaccination and the Global Burden of Rotavirus Diarrhea Among Children Younger Than 5 Years – JAMA Pediatrics (free)

“Rotavirus-associated mortality has decreased by 48.2% in children under 5 between 1990 and 2016” (via @IHME_UW see Tweet with infographics)

 


A Placebo-Controlled Trial of Bezafibrate in Primary Biliary Cholangitis – New England Journal of Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: A Trial of Bezafibrate in Primary Biliary Cholangitis – NEJM Resident 360 (free) AND Bezafibrate Normalizes Liver Enzymes in PBC – MedPage Today (free registration required)

“In a randomized trial of patients with primary biliary cholangitis, bezafibrate and ursodeoxycholic acid resulted in a higher rate of complete biochemical response than ursodeoxycholic acid alone” (via @NEJM see Tweet with visual abstract)

 


Acid‐suppressive drugs and risk of kidney disease: A systematic review and meta‐analysis – Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Source: Hospital Medicine Virtual Journal Club

Proton pump inhibitors were associated with higher risks of acute interstitial nephritis (HR, 2.78; 95% CI, 1.25‐6.17), acute kidney injury (HR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.33‐2.59), chronic kidney disease (HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.03‐2.09), and end‐stage renal disease (HR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.26‐2.04) than non‐PPI therapy. Similar risks were not identified for H2RA therapy.

 


Risk of Recurrent Disease and Surgery Following an Admission for Acute Diverticulitis – Diseases of the Colon and Rectum (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentary: Which Patients with Diverticulitis Require Surgery? – Diseases of the Colon & Rectum, via NewsWise (free)

In this large cohort of 65,162 patients identified with a first episode of acute diverticulitis, younger patients, women, smokers, obese individuals, and those who had diverticulitis with perforation and/or abscess were more likely to develop recurrent diverticulitis.

 


Safety of hydroxyanthracene derivatives for use in food – EFSA Journal (free)

Press release: EFSA confirms health concerns for hydroxyanthracene derivatives in food – European Food Safety Agency (free)

Commentary: Europe’s safety watchdog says laxatives may increase cancer risk – Reuters (free)

“This group of substances naturally occurs in plants such as aloe or senna species. Extracts containing them are used in food supplements for their laxative effect”. (from Press Release)

 


The use of probiotics to prevent Clostridium difficile diarrhea associated with antibiotic use – Cochrane Library (free)

See related meta-analysis: Timely Use of Probiotics in Hospitalized Adults Prevents Clostridium difficile Infection

“Based on this systematic review and meta-analysis of 31 randomized controlled trials including 8672 patients, moderate certainty evidence suggests that probiotics are effective for preventing C. difficile-associated diarrhea”

 


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