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Open access

EBM & Clinical Trials

Does Cancer Screening Save More Lives Overall? Not Necessarily – WBUR (free) (via @HealthNewsRevu see Tweet)

Related systematic review: Does screening for disease save lives in asymptomatic adults? Systematic review of meta-analyses and randomized trials – International Journal of Epidemiology (free)

“We are not suggesting that cancer screening is useless. Our critique aims to show that screening tests are like any other medical intervention: there are benefits and harms.  And it’s why we support informed decision-making”.

 


A Failure to Heal – The New York Times Magazine (10 articles per month are free) (RT @camialderighi see Tweet)

 


Our Review Criteria – HealthNewsReview (free)

“Such a great list! Ten Criteria for Reviewing a News Article on Health. Cost, harms, quality of evidence, disease-mongering, conflict of interest, etc.” (RT @CaulfieldTim see Tweet)

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 4 December 2017 – The BMJ Opinion (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals.

 


Five ways to fix statistics – Nature (free)

“As debate rumbles on about how and how much poor statistics is to blame for poor reproducibility, Nature asked influential statisticians to recommend one change to improve science. The common theme? The problem is not our maths, but ourselves”.

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 27 November 2017 – The BMJ Opinion (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals.

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 20 November 2017 – The BMJ (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals.

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 13 November 2017 – The BMJ Opinion (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals.

 


Richard Lehman’s journal reviews, 6 November 2017 – The BMJ Opinion (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals.

 


Why we need better evidence – Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, University of Oxford (free)

“20 fundamental problems with the production of evidence” (RT @CochraneUK see Tweet)

 


Payments by US pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers to US medical journal editors: retrospective observational study – The BMJ (free)

“Industry payments to journal editors are common and often large, particularly for certain subspecialties. Journals should consider the potential impact of such payments on public trust in published research”.

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 17 October 2017 – The BMJ Opinion (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals.

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 9 October 2017 – The BMJ Opinion (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals.

 


Challenges in the Design and Interpretation of Noninferiority Trials – New England Journal of Medicine (free)

See also other articles in The Changing Face of Clinical Trials Series (all free)

“All too often non-inferiority clinical trials are a means of asserting false equivalence” (RT @EricTopol see Tweet)

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 2 October 2017 – The BMJ Opinion (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals.

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 25 September 2017 – The BMJ Opinion (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals.

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 18 September 2017 – The BMJ Opinion (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals.

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 11 September 2017 (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals.

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review / 4 September 2017 (free)

Richard Lehman’s weekly review of medical journals.

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 29 August 2017 – The BMJ Blogs (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals.

 


Bored reading science? Let’s change how scientists write – The Conversation (free) (RT @Onisillos see Tweet)

“Science communicators, journalists, entrepreneurs, policymakers and interested members of the general public are all motivated to follow the latest scientific research. And yet, strangely enough, science papers are a communication tool but they are not that effective at communication”.

 


The Future of Peer Review – Scientific American (free)

“It’s very far from perfect, but major changes for the better are underway”

 


8 – Richard Lehman’s journal review, 14 August 2017 – The BMJ Blogs (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals

 


These People Are Trying To Fix A Huge Problem In Science – BuzzFeed News (free)

“Big, important findings of previous studies – things we thought we knew – have failed to stand up to scrutiny”… (RT @Students4BE see Tweet)

 


Half of papers searched for online are free to read – Nature News (free)

“Large study of open research analysed reader data from Unpaywall tool, which finds freely available versions of articles”.

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 7 August 2017 – The BMJ Blogs (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals.

 


A surprising amount of medical research isn’t made public. That’s dangerous – VOX (free)

“When the results of clinical trials aren’t made public, the consequences can be dangerous — and potentially deadly” (RT @Students4BE see Tweet)

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 31 July 2017 – The BMJ Blogs (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals.

 


Big names in statistics want to shake up much-maligned P value – Nature News (free)

“One of scientists’ favorite statistics — the P value — should face tougher standards, say leading researchers”

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 24 July 2017 – The BMJ Blogs (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals.

 


Cocoa and blood pressure: food for thought – Evidently Cochrane (free)

Important considerations when reading research papers.

 


Research Methods & Reporting: How to design efficient cluster randomised trials – The BMJ (free)

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 17 July 2017 – The BMJ Blogs (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals.

 


How to spot a misleading graph, by Lea Gaslowitz – TED Talks (free YouTube video)

“How to spot a misleading graph – Great video by Lea Gaslowitz @TEDTalks” (RT @CochraneUK see Tweet)

 


The hidden truth about our prescription medications – Ideas.Ted.Com (free)

“Uncovering the tale of hidden clinical trial data on prescription drugs” (RT @CebmOxford see Tweet) AND “Around half of the clinical trials that were done on the medicines we use today have never published their results…” (RT @Students4BE see Tweet)

 


Is a chart lying to you? This video has some tips to figure it out. – VOX (free text and video)

“Graphs are supposed to distill complex information. But sometimes they can mislead…” (RT @Students4BE see Tweet)

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review / 10 July 2017 – The BMJ Blogs (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals

 


Research Methods & Reporting: CONSORT 2010 statement: extension checklist for reporting within person randomised trials – The BMJ (free)

“This document presents the CONSORT extension to within person trials. It aims to facilitate the reporting of these trials. It extends 16 items of the CONSORT 2010 checklist and introduces a modified flowchart and baseline table to enhance transparency”.

 


Fears over a medical gold rush in cancer drug race – Financial Times (a few articles per month are free)

Source: Nature Newsletter

“With almost 800 trials under way observers warn scientific rigour is being compromised”

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 3 July 2017 – The BMJ Blogs (free)

Richard Lehman’s weekly review of medical journals.

 


Living Systematic Reviews are going live – Cochrane UK (free) (RT @CochraneUK see Tweet)

Related: Living Systematic Reviews – Cochrane Community (free)

“Living Systematic Review is a “systematic review which is continually updated, incorporating relevant new evidence as it becomes available”.

 


Editorial: Judging the benefits and harms of medicines – The BMJ (free for 15 days)

“Please read/comment on our editorial @bmj_latest about @acmedsci report on judging benefits and harms of medicines” (RT @fgodlee see Tweet)

 


Last Month in Oncology with Dr. Bishal Gyawali: June 2017 – ecancer News (free)

“New edition of my blogs @ecancer is out focusing on studies presented at #ASCO17 (RT @oncology_bg see Tweet)

 


Blinding: A detailed guide for students – Students 4 Best Evidence (free)

“New @Students4BE blog: Saul provides a detailed overview of ‘blinding’ in RCTs. What is it & why is it important?” (RT @CochraneUK see Tweet)

 


Richard Lehman’s journal review, 26 June 2017 – The BMJ Blogs (free)

Richard Lehman reviews the latest research in the top medical journals

 


Better Medicine – Shared decisions, best evidence

Related article: Overdiagnosis and overtreatment: generalists — it’s time for a grassroots revolution (free)

“This Better Medicine resource page builds on the work of The BMJ’s Too Much Medicine initiative and the overdiagnosis group of the RCGP in helping health professionals worldwide to share knowledge with patients and jointly make better informed choices about their care.

 


Machine Learning Versus Standard Techniques for Updating Searches for Systematic Reviews: A Diagnostic Accuracy Study – Annals of Internal Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentary: Artificial intelligence may help doctors keep up with new research – Reuters (free)

“Machine-learning fed by citations of a systematic saved a ton of time for updating it, didn’t miss important studies” (RT @hildabast see Tweet)

 


Multiple outcomes and analyses in clinical trials create challenges for interpretation and research synthesis – Journal of Clinical Epidemiology (free)

“RCTs included hundreds of outcomes and results; a small proportion were in public reports. Trialists and meta-analysts may cherry-pick what they report from multiple sources of RCT information.” (RT @hildabast see Tweet)

 


Updated tutorial: What is a Systematic Review? – PubMed Health (free) (RT @hildabast)

 


Joint statement on public disclosure of results from clinical trials – World Health Organization (free)

News release: Major research funders and international NGOs to implement WHO standards on reporting clinical trial results (free)

Commentary: Industry leaders agree to implement UN agency’s standards on clinical trial reporting – United Nations News Centre (free)

“Funders of medical research & international NGOs to implement WHO standards on reporting clinical trial results”. “Today, on average 50% of Clinical Trials go unreported, according to several studies, often because the results are negative”. “Unreported trial results leave an incomplete & potentially misleading picture of the risks & benefits of vaccines, drugs and medical devices” (see Tweets)

 


Review: Countering cognitive biases in minimizing low value care – The Medical Journal of Australia (free)

“How cognitive bias affects clinical decision making and what to do about it. Well written & useful” (RT @carissa_bon and @JulieLeask see Tweet)

 


Research letter: Applicability of the IMPROVE-IT Trial to Current Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome – JAMA Internal Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full text)

Source: Cardiac Patients in Trials Don’t Reflect Real-World Populations – MedPage Today (free registration required)

Related: Exclusion of patients with concomitant chronic conditions in ongoing randomised controlled trials targeting 10 common chronic conditions and registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: a systematic review of registration details – BMJ Open (free) AND Do cancer clinical trials exaggerate the real-world benefits of drugs? – STAT News (free)

Patients in clinical trials are often younger, healthier (with less comorbidities), better plugged in to the health care system, better educated and wealthier, indicating that the external validity or generalizability of much of the current evidence to real-world settings may be relatively weak.

 


Too many studies have hidden conflicts of interest. A new tool makes it easier to see them – VOX (free)

“Great news: PubMed is finally publishing info about funding sources/conflicts of interest on its abstracts” (RT @paimadhu and @juliaoftorontosee Tweet)

 


Unpaywall finds free versions of paywalled papers – Nature (free) (RT @dannykay68)

See also: Unlocking paywalled research papers: Two big steps forward, two steps back, by James C Coyne – Coyne of the Realm (RT @hildabast)

Apparently, it successfully finds an open-access version (completely legal) of a paper around 30% of the time. We have tried and it worked for some of the articles we’ve tested. See it for yourself.

 


Regression to the mean, or why perfection rarely lasts – The Conversation (free) (RT @PaulGlasziou)

“Regression to the mean, and its importance in healthcare decisions” (RT @Tammy_Hoffmann see Tweet)

 


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