Open access

NEWS - Endocrinology

#ACC18 – The ODYSSEY Trial Ends Well— But Will It Be Enough? – Cardiobrief (free) AND Ten Quick Thoughts on ODYSSEY – John Mandrola, via Medscape (free registration required)

“An absolute risk reduction of 1.6% in the primary endpoint translates to a number needed to treat of 64. Using the current price of $14,500 per year, Kaul calculated that preventing one event over the trial period of almost 3 years would cost about $2.6 million” (via John Mandrola). This study was presented at #ACC18 and has not been published yet. Among the many commentaries, these two were selected for a balanced point of view.


Effect of dietary carbohydrate restriction on glycemic control in adults with diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis – Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

“Carbohydrate-restricted diets, associated with reductions in HbA1c of around 0.4% in short term” (via @kamleshkhunti see Tweet)


It’s poverty, not individual choice, that is driving extraordinary obesity level – The Conversation (free)

“Statistics point remorselessly towards obesity being a symptom with an underlying social cause”.


Real-time continuous glucose monitoring in adults with type 1 diabetes and impaired hypoglycaemia awareness or severe hypoglycaemia treated with multiple daily insulin injections (HypoDE): a multicentre, randomised controlled trial – The Lancet (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

The mean number of hypoglycemic events per 28 days was reduced from 10.8 to 3.5 among patients in the continuous glucose monitoring group and from 14.4 to 13.7 among control group participants.


Atypical antipsychotics, insulin resistance and weight; a meta-analysis of healthy volunteer studies – Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry (link to abstract – $ for full-text) (via @psychopharmacol see Tweet)

“These findings provide preliminary evidence that atypical antipsychotics cause insulin resistance and weight gain directly, independent of psychiatric disease and may be associated with length of treatment”.


Risk of pre-eclampsia in women taking metformin: a systematic review and meta-analysis – Diabetic Medicine (free)

Source: ACP Journal Wise ($)

“Metformin was associated with lower gestational weight gain and a lower risk of pre-eclampsia compared with insulin”


Associations of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplement Use With Cardiovascular Disease Risks: Meta-analysis of 10 Trials Involving 77 917 Individuals – JAMA Cardiology (free)

Commentary: Omega-3 Supplements Don’t Protect Against Heart Disease – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

Omega-3 fatty acids did not prevent fatal or nonfatal coronary heart disease or any major vascular events.


Effect of PCSK9 Inhibitors on Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Hypercholesterolemia: A Meta‐Analysis of 35 Randomized Controlled Trials – Journal of the American Heart Association (free)

PCSK9 inhibitors were associated with reduced incidence of myocardial infarction (2.3% vs 3,6%), stroke (1.0% vs 1.4%) and coronary revascularization (4,2% vs 5,8%). Overall, no significant change was observed in cardiovascular or all-cause mortality.


Circulating vitamin D concentration and risk of seven cancers: Mendelian randomisation study – The BMJ (free)

Commentary: Vitamin D level not associated with cancer risk – Clinical Adviser (free)

“These results, in combination with previous literature, provide evidence that population-wide screening for vitamin D deficiency and subsequent widespread vitamin D supplementation should not currently be recommended as a strategy for primary cancer prevention”.


Incidence, Demographics, and Clinical Characteristics of Diabetes of the Exocrine Pancreas (Type 3c): A Retrospective Cohort Study – Diabetes Care (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentary: Newly-identified third type of diabetes is being wrongly diagnosed as type 2 – The Conversation (free)

“Diabetes of the exocrine pancreas is frequently labeled type 2 diabetes but has worse glycemic control and a markedly greater requirement for insulin”.


Concurrent bariatric operations and association with perioperative outcomes: registry based cohort study – The BMJ (free)

“Concurrent bariatric operations occurred infrequently, but when they did, there was no observable increased risk for adverse perioperative outcomes compared with non-concurrent operations”.


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