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Antibiotics for acute rhinosinusitis in adults – Cochrane Library (free for a limited period)

Summary: Antibiotics for sinus infection of short duration in adults – Cochrane Library (free)

“Considering antibiotic resistance, and the very low incidence of serious complications, we conclude there is no place for antibiotics for people with uncomplicated acute rhinosinusitis.”

 


Are We Being Misled About Precision Medicine? – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

“Doctors and hospitals love to talk about the cancer patients they’ve saved, and reporters love to write about them. But deaths still vastly outnumber the rare successes.”

 


Screening: How overdiagnosis and other harms can undermine the benefits – Health News Review (free)

“All screening programs do harm, some do good as well.”

 


Association of dairy intake with cardiovascular disease and mortality in 21 countries from five continents (PURE): a prospective cohort study – The Lancet (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: The Lancet: Dairy consumption linked to lower rates of cardiovascular disease and mortality – EurekAlert (free) AND Dairy food in moderation ‘may protect the heart’ – The Guardian (free) AND Is Whole-Fat Dairy Good for the Heart? – New York Times (free)

Related: Meta-Analysis: Cheese consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease (link to abstract and commentaries) AND Milk and dairy consumption and risk of cardiovascular diseases and all-cause mortality (free study and commentaries)

“It is not the ultimate seal of approval for recommending whole-fat dairy over its low-fat or skimmed counterparts. Readers should be cautious, and treat this study only as yet another piece of the evidence (albeit a large one) in the literature.”

 


The Moral Dilemma of Learning Medicine from the Poor – The Doctors Weight In (free) (via @kennylinafp)

“I learned good skills because I was allowed to practice on people who had no other option.”

 


Statins for primary prevention of cardiovascular events and mortality in old and very old adults with and without type 2 diabetes: retrospective cohort study – The BMJ (free)

Editorial: Primary prevention with statins for older adults (free)

Commentaries: Expert reaction to study on use of statins in older people – Science Media Centre (free) AND Widespread use of statins in healthy older people to prevent heart disease not recommended in new study – BMJ, via ScienceDaily (free)

“New research does not support widespread use of statins in healthy older people to prevent heart disease and stroke. Results found that any protective effect was limited to those with type 2 diabetes aged between 75 and 84” (via @bmj_latest see Tweet)

 


Screening for Syphilis Infection in Pregnant Women: US Preventive Services Task Force Reaffirmation Recommendation Statement – JAMA (free)

Editorial: Congenital Syphilis—Still a Shadow on the Land (free)

“The USPSTF recommends early screening for syphilis infection in all pregnant women. (A recommendation)”

 


Good Documentation – JAMA (free for a limited period)

“In this narrative medicine essay, the author, who transitioned from paper and pen to computer-generated electronic health record keeping wonders whether the self-select menu items ultimately dehumanizes both the patient and the physician.” (via @JAMA_current see Tweet)

 


Primary antifungal prophylaxis for cryptococcal disease in HIV‐positive people – Cochrane Library (free for a limited period)

Summary: Preventing cryptococcal disease in HIV-positive people – Cochrane Library (free)

“Antifungal prophylaxis reduced the risk of developing and dying from cryptococcal disease. Therefore, where CrAG screening is not available, antifungal prophylaxis may be used in patients with low CD4 counts at diagnosis and who are at risk of developing cryptococcal disease.”

 


Antidepressants for treating depression in dementia – Cochrane Library (free for a limited period)

Summary: Antidepressants for treating depression in dementia – Cochrane Library (free)

“On the only measure of efficacy for which we had high-quality evidence (depression rating scale scores), antidepressants showed little or no effect.”

 


Abraar Karan: Changing the way we communicate about patients – The BMJ Opinion (free) (via @NUNESDOC)

“Father of 2, retired car salesman and keen on football NOT the colon cancer in Bed 4 – social history brings humanity back to the bedside” (via @hospicedoctor see Tweet)

 


Did Juul Lure Teenagers and Get ‘Customers for Life’? – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

“…will it be possible to get people who are addicted to cigarettes to switch to e-cigarettes, which are less harmful, without enticing a new generation or non-smokers to try them?” (via @CaulfieldTim see Tweet)

 


Type 2 Poliovirus Detection after Global Withdrawal of Trivalent Oral Vaccine – New England Journal of Medicine (free)

“Wild-type transmission of poliovirus is nearly halted. To eradicate poliomyelitis, cessation of vaccine-derived poliovirus transmission must also be addressed. Strategies to accomplish this are analyzed.” (via @NEJM see Tweet)

 


Six-Month Outcomes after Restrictive or Liberal Transfusion for Cardiac Surgery – New England Journal of Medicine (free for a limited period)

“In moderate-to-high-risk patients undergoing cardiac surgery, six-month outcomes show that a restrictive red-cell transfusion strategy is noninferior to a liberal strategy” (via @NEJM see Tweet with Visual Abstract)

 


High-sensitivity troponin in the evaluation of patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome: a stepped-wedge, cluster-randomised controlled trial – The Lancet (free)

Commentaries: Diagnosing myocardial infarction: a highly sensitive issue – The Lancet (free) AND Hs-TnI in Suspected ACS: High-STEACS Trial – American College of Cardiology (free) AND Is High Sensitivity Troponin Too Sensitive? – NEJM Journal Watch (free)

“Introduction of a high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I assay reclassified 1 in 6 patients with previously undetected myocardial necrosis, but did not lead to improved clinical outcomes in this large randomised trial” (via @chapdoc1 see Tweet)

“Very important study. What’s weird is that the “better” (more sensitive) troponin assays get, the less helpful the test becomes at the bedside. Look for a coming tsunami of iatrogenesis from overzealous evaluation of troponin bumps.” (via @drjohnm see Tweet)

 


ESC Council on hypertension position document on the management of hypertensive emergencies – European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy (free) (@Abraham_RMI)

“Patients that lack acute hypertension-mediated end organ damage to the heart, retina, brain, kidneys, or large arteries do not have a hypertensive emergency and can be treated with oral BP-lowering agents and usually discharged after a brief period of observation.”

 


Optimal Blood Pressure Target in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Hypertensive Patients – Circulation Research (free)

See counterpoint suggesting lower BP targets: Sprinting Toward the Optimal Blood Pressure Target for Hypertensive Patients – Circulation Research (free)

“We have reviewed the randomized trial evidence in favor of a target blood pressure (BP) around 130/80 mm Hg in hypertensive patients with and without diabetes mellitus”

 


Environmental toxic metal contaminants and risk of cardiovascular disease: systematic review and meta-analysis – The BMJ (free)

Editorial: Environmental metals and cardiovascular disease (free)

Commentary: Experts warn of cardiovascular risk from heavy metal pollution – University of Cambridge (free)

“Since metals are associated with cardiovascular disease even at relatively low levels of exposure, population wide strategies to minimize exposure can further contribute to overall cardiovascular prevention efforts” (from @bmj_latest see Tweet)

 


Immigration as a Social Determinant of Health: Proceedings of a Workshop – National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (free PDF)

“Immigration as a social determinant of health – NEW publication explores complex interactions between immigration and health disparities + grappling with the complexities of immigration” (via @julianmfisher see Tweet)

 


Earwax, Of All Things, Poses Unrecognized Risk In Long-Term Care – Kaiser Health News (free)

“Of all the indignities that come with aging, excessive earwax may be the most insidious… when it goes unrecognized, it can pose serious problems, especially for the 2.2 million people who live in U.S. nursing homes and assisted living centers.”

 


Guideline for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis – Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (free PDF)

News Release: Updated osteoarthritis guideline designed to reduce unnecessary imaging and surgery (free)

Commentary: Australia hopes to reduce unnecessary imaging, surgery with updated osteoarthritis guidelines – Health Imaging (free)

““The Guideline for the management of knee and hip osteoarthritis,” offer up exercise and weight loss as a first line defense, and warn against costly treatments using glucosamine, opioids and arthroscopic surgery, said David Hunter, co-chair of the RACGP group responsible for the update.” (from Health Imaging)

 


Guide to Statistics and Methods: Case-Control Studies: Using “Real-world” Evidence to Assess Association – JAMA (free for a limited period)

 


Coronary CT Angiography and 5-Year Risk of Myocardial Infarction – New England Journal of Medicine (free for a limited period)

Commentary: Five Reasons I Don’t Believe an Imaging Test Improves Outcomes – by Dr. John Mandrola, in Medscape (free registration required)

See also an interesting Tweetorial by @AnilMakam, also suggesting caution before adopting this study results in clinical practice.

 


The Community Health Worker Boom – NEJM Catalyst (free)

“The key question is not whether community health workers are effective, but how we can make them as effective as possible.”

 


Using a New EHR System to Increase Patient Engagement, Improve Efficiency, and Decrease Cost – NEJM Catalyst (free)

“Another solution might be to capitalize on patients’ vested interest in their own health care by actively engaging them in the entry of their own medical history information into the EHR.”

 


Publish peer reviews – Nature News (free)

“Jessica K. Polka and colleagues call on journals to sign a pledge to make reviewers’ anonymous comments part of the official scientific record.”

 


Antibiotics for prolonged wet cough in children – Cochrane Library (link to abstract and plain language summary – $ for full-text)

Commentary: Antibiotics for pediatric chronic wet cough: Cochrane review – Univadis (free registration required)

 


Alcohol use and burden for 195 countries and territories, 1990–2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 – The Lancet (free)

Commentaries: No level of alcohol consumption improves health – The Lancet (free) AND No amount of alcohol is good for your overall health, global study says – CNN (free) AND New scientific study: no safe level of alcohol – Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (free)

“Alcohol was responsible for nearly 3 million deaths in 2016, the study says. It was the leading risk factor for disease and premature death in men and women between the ages of 15 and 49 worldwide in 2016, accounting for nearly one in 10 deaths.” (from @cnni see Tweet)

 


How scientists are learning to predict your future with your genes – VOX (free) (via @EricTopol)

“There’s not one light switch but hundreds, each with the ability to slightly increase or decrease the chances of developing the illness.”

 


The Challenge of Reforming Nutritional Epidemiologic Research – JAMA (free for a limited period)

“…the emerging picture of nutritional epidemiology is difficult to reconcile with good scientific principles. The field needs radical reform.”

 


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