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NEWS - TOP 10

Thu, August 23 – 10 Stories of The Day!

23 Aug,2018

 

1 – Podcast: #109: Things We Do For No Reason: A High Value Episode – The Curbsiders (free audio and summary)

Related Series: Choosing Wisely: Things We Do For No Reason – Journal of Hospital Medicine (some free articles)

 

2 – Perspective: Outbreaks in a Rapidly Changing Central Africa — Lessons from Ebola – New England Journal of Medicine (free)

Related: Experimental Ebola treatments OK’d in DRC as cases top 100 – CIDRAP (free) AND Congo approves more experimental Ebola treatments as cases rise – Reuters (free)

 

3 – Sport Specialization and Risk of Overuse Injuries: A Systematic Review With Meta-analysis – Pediatrics (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentary: Sport specialization tied to injuries in kids and teens – Reuters (free)

 

4 – Asthma and COPD Overlap in Women: Incidence and Risk Factors – Annals of the American Thoracic Society (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: More than 40 percent of women with asthma may develop COPD, but risk may be reduced – Annals of Thoracic Society (free) AND Four in 10 women with asthma may develop COPD – Reuters (free) AND Four in 10 women with asthma may develop COPD – OnMedica (free)

 

5 – Perspective: Exploring the Relationship Between Depression and Dementia – JAMA (free for a limited period)

 

6 – Association Between Electronic Cigarette Use and Myocardial Infarction – American Journal of Preventive Medicine (free for a limited period)

Commentary: Risk of heart attacks is double for daily e-cigarette users – University of California – San Francisco, via ScienceDaily (free)

“New analysis shows five-fold risk for people who use both cigarettes and e-cigarettes daily”

 

7 – Phosphate binders for preventing and treating chronic kidney disease‐mineral and bone disorder (CKD‐MBD) – Cochrane Library (free for a limited period)

Summary: Phosphate binders to prevent complications of chronic kidney disease – Cochrane Library (free)

 

8 – Extended antibiotic infusions could save lives: Here’s how to do it – PulmCCM (free)

Related Research: Mortality lower with prolonged vs. short-term IV infusion of antipseudomonal beta-lactams (free)

The simplest (and cheapest) technique is simply to reduce the time between doses.”

 

9 – Seven days of antibiotics were as good as 14 for gram-negative bacteremia – PulmCCM (free)

Related Commentary: Seven-day antibiotic course delivers similar outcomes to 14-days for Gram-negative bacteraemia – European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, via EurekAlert (free)

“It’s important to note that source control was believed to be achieved in all enrolled patients. If source control cannot be achieved (e.g., an abscess, or an infected heart valve or indwelling catheter that cannot safely be removed), prolonged antibiotic courses are often advisable.”

 

10 – Breastfeeding History and Risk of Stroke Among Parous Postmenopausal Women in the Women’s Health Initiative – Journal of the American Heart Association (free)

Commentaries: Breastfeeding linked to lower stroke risk – Reuters (free) AND Breastfeeding may help protect mothers against stroke – AHA News (free)

“…ultimately, the study is observational, which means that it can only prove that breastfeeding is associated with lower risk of stroke as opposed to being the cause of the lowered risk.” (from Reuters)

 

Tue, August 21 – 10 Stories of The Day!

21 Aug,2018

 

1 – Chagas Cardiomyopathy: An Update of Current Clinical Knowledge and Management: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association – Circulation (free PDF)

AHA News Release: Chagas disease, caused by a parasite, has spread outside of Latin America and carries a high risk of heart disease (free)

Top Ten Things to Know: Chagas Cardiomyopathy: An Update of Current Clinical Knowledge and Management (free PDF)

 

2 – Clinical Report: The Power of Play: A Pediatric Role in Enhancing Development in Young Children – Pediatrics (free)

News Release: Want Creative, Curious, Healthier Children with 21st Century Skills? Let Them Play – American Academy of Pediatrics (free)

Commentary: It’s come to this: A checkup with the pediatrician may soon include a prescription for play – Los Angeles Times (free) AND Let Kids Play – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free) AND AAP Report Highlights Importance of Children’s Play for Development – Journal Watch (free)

 

3 – Rapid Communication: Key changes to treatment of multidrug- and rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/RR-TB) – World Health Organization (free PDF)

News Release: WHO announces landmark changes in MDR-TB treatment regimens (free)

Commentary: WHO revises MDR-TB treatment with focus on oral drugs – CIDRAP (free)

 

4 – Measles cases hit record high in the European Region – World Health Organization (free)

Commentaries: Measles cases hit record high in Europe – BBC (free) AND Expert reaction to measles cases in Europe – Science Media Centre (free) AND Low MMR uptake blamed for surge in measles cases across Europe – The Guardian (free) AND Measles cases reach record high in Europe – CNN (free)

 

5 – Assessment of the Safety of Discharging Select Patients Directly Home From the Intensive Care Unit: A Multicenter Population-Based Cohort Study – JAMA Internal Medicine (free for a limited period)

Invited Commentary: The Complexity and Challenges of Intensive Care Unit Admissions and Discharges: Similarities With All Hospitalized Patients – JAMA Internal Medicine (free for a limited period)

 

6 – Clinical Update: Management of Groin Hernias in Adults—2018 – JAMA (free for a limited period)

 

7 – Perspective: This Drug Is Safe and Effective. Wait. Compared With What? – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

 

8 – Rotavirus Vaccination and the Global Burden of Rotavirus Diarrhea Among Children Younger Than 5 Years – JAMA Pediatrics (free)

“Rotavirus-associated mortality has decreased by 48.2% in children under 5 between 1990 and 2016” (via @IHME_UW see Tweet with infographics)

 

9 – Optimising first- and second-line treatment strategies for untreated major depressive disorder — the SUND study: a pragmatic, multi-centre, assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial – BMC Medicine (free)

 

10 – Clinical chemistry score versus high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I and T tests alone to identify patients at low or high risk for myocardial infarction or death at presentation to the emergency department – Canadian Medical Association Journal (free)

Commentaries: Simple score to diagnose heart attacks is safer, faster than current methods – McMaster University (free) AND Clinical Chemistry Score Helps Rule Out Diagnosis of Heart Attack – MedicalResearch.com (free)

 

Mon, August 20 – 10 Stories of The Day!

20 Aug,2018

 

1 – Oral steroids for resolution of otitis media with effusion in children (OSTRICH): a double-blinded, placebo-controlled randomised trial – The Lancet (free)

Invited commentary: Helping children with hearing loss from otitis media with effusion – The Lancet (free)

“Short-course oral prednisolone is not an effective treatment for most children aged 2–8 years with persistent otitis media with effusion but is well tolerated—findings from OSTRICH, the first placebo-controlled trial” (via @TheLancet see Tweet)

 

2 – Report: E-Cigarettes – House of Commons Science and Technology Committee (free PDF)

Commentaries: Stop treating e-cigs like conventional cigarettes, MPs tell NHS – OnMedica (free) AND E-cigarettes can be key weapon against smoking, say MPs – BBC (free)

See also: related guidelines, reports and commentaries on e-cigarettes (all free)

 

3 – Corticosteroids in Sepsis: An Updated Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis – Critical Care Medicine (free)

Related: Corticosteroid therapy for sepsis: a clinical practice guideline – The BMJ (free)

 

4 – Vitamin D, the Sunshine Supplement, Has Shadowy Money Behind It – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free) (via @CarlosdelRio7 see Tweet)

Related commentaries: Vitamin D Screening and Supplementation in Primary Care: Time to Curb Our Enthusiasm – American Family Physician (free) AND Your vitamin D tests and supplements are probably a waste of money – VOX (free) AND Why Are So Many People Popping Vitamin D? – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free)

Related Guideline: Vitamin D: supplement use in specific population groups – National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (free)

“Only test vitamin D status if someone has symptoms of deficiency or is at very high risk” (from NICE Guideline)

 

5 – Too Much Medicine: A small medical conference with a big impact – HealthNewsReview (free)

 

6 – Review: Intravenous fluid therapy in critically ill adults – Nature Reviews Nephrology (free for a limited period) (via @CritCareReviews)

 

7 – Review: Airway and ventilation management during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and after successful resuscitation – Critical Care (free)

 

8 – Disease Outbreak News: Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo – World Health Organization (free)

Commentaries: WHO Expects Ebola To Spread In Congo In Areas Too Dangerous To Send Workers – NPR (free) AND Health worker among 5 new cases in DRC Ebola outbreak – CIDRAP (free) AND Militia threat hampers Ebola fight in Congo as disease kills 47 – Reuters (free)

 

9 – Association of Body Mass Index With Blood Pressure Among 1.7 Million Chinese Adults – JAMA Network Open (free)

Commentary: As body mass index increases, blood pressure may as well – Yale University (free)

 

10 – Dietary carbohydrate intake and mortality: a prospective cohort study and meta-analysis – The Lancet Public Health (free)

Commentaries: Evolving evidence about diet and health – The Lancet Public Health (free) AND Expert reaction to study looking at carbohydrate intake and health – Science Media Centre (free) AND Moderate carbohydrate intake may be best for health, study suggests – The Lancet, via ScienceDaily (free) AND Low-carb diets could shorten life, study suggests – BBC (free)

 

Fri, August 17 – 10 Stories of The Day!

17 Aug,2018

 

1 – 2018 AHA/ACC Guideline for the Management of Adults With Congenital Heart Disease (free PDF)

News Release: Societies Release Updated Guideline for Treating Adult Congenital Heart Disease Patients (free)

Key Points to Remember: 2018 AHA/ACC Guideline for Adults With Congenital Heart Disease – American College of Cardiology (free)

 

2 – Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Pain, Agitation/Sedation, Delirium, Immobility, and Sleep Disruption in Adult Patients in the ICU – Critical Care Medicine (free) (via @Abraham_RMI)

 

3 – Association of Compensation From the Surgical and Medical Device Industry to Physicians and Self-declared Conflict of Interest – JAMA Surgery (free for a limited period)

Author Interview: Association of Compensation to Physicians From Industry and Self-declared Conflict of Interest (free)

Commentaries: Safeguarding Against Conflicts of Interest in the Surgical Literature – JAMA Surgery (free for a limited period) AND Financial Ties That Bind: Studies Often Fall Short On Conflict-Of-Interest Disclosures – Kaiser Health News (free)

 

4 – Recent trends in life expectancy across high income countries: retrospective observational study – The BMJ (free)

Editorial: Reversals in life expectancy in high income countries? (free for a limited period)

Commentaries: Life Expectancy Declining Across High Income Countries – Eurasia Review (free) AND Australians living longer but life expectancy dips in US and UK – The Guardian (free) AND UK life expectancy drops while other western countries improve – NHS Choices (free)

 

5 – Changes in midlife death rates across racial and ethnic groups in the United States: systematic analysis of vital statistics – The BMJ (free)

Infographic: Why is US Life Expectancy Falling Behind? (free PDF)

Commentary: Life expectancy drops in the US and the UK, rises in Australia, a new study finds – CNN (free)

 

6 – Keeping Up With Cardiology: Old-School Learning Versus the Twittersphere – TCTMD (free)

Related: Scientists on Twitter: Preaching to the choir or singing from the rooftops? – Facets (free) AND Rise of the Tweetorial – Precious Bodily Fluids (free) AND Social Medicine: Twitter in Healthcare – Journal of Clinical Medicine (free) AND University of Twitter? Scientists give impromptu lecture critiquing nutrition research – CBC (free) AND Twitter-Based Medicine: How Social Media is Changing the Public’s View of Medicine – The Health Care Blog (free) AND What’s your doctor reading? How social media is disrupting medical education – National Post (free)

 

7 – Effect of Peer Comparison Letters for High-Volume Primary Care Prescribers of Quetiapine in Older and Disabled Adults: A Randomized Clinical Trial – JAMA Psychiatry (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: Behavioral nudges lead to striking drop in prescriptions of potent antipsychotic – Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, via ScienceDaily (free) AND Study Reduces Over-prescription of Antipsychotics in Older Adults – Mad in America (free) AND ‘Dear Doctor’ Letters Use Peer Pressure, Government Warning To Stop Overprescribing – NPR (free) AND Peer Pressure Tactic Successfully Curbs Overprescribing – Medscape (free registration required)

 

8 – Smoking Cessation, Weight Change, Type 2 Diabetes, and Mortality – The New England Journal of Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: Weight gain after smoking cessation linked with increased short-term diabetes risk – Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (free) AND Weight gain temporarily hikes diabetes risk when smokers quit – Reuters (free) AND Smokers Are Better Off After They Quit Even if They Gain Weight – Physician’s First Watch (free)

 

9 – Endovascular coiling versus neurosurgical clipping for people with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage – Cochrane Library (free for a limited period)

Summary: Endovascular coiling versus neurosurgical clipping for people with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage – Cochrane Library (free)

 

10 – Association of Maternal Insecticide Levels With Autism in Offspring From a National Birth Cohort – The American Journal of Psychiatry (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: Autism and DDT: What one million pregnancies can — and can’t — reveal – Nature News (free) AND Epidemiologists Link DDT From The 1970s To Modern Autism Diagnoses – Science 2.0 (free – skeptical point of view on study results)

 

Thu, August 16 – 10 Stories of The Day!

16 Aug,2018

 

1 – Risk Factors, Mortality, and Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes – New England Journal of Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: In Type 2 Diabetes, Five Risk Factor Targets Keep MI, Stroke, and Death in Check – TCTMD (free) AND How People With Type 2 Diabetes Can Lower Their Risk of Health Problems – TIME (free) AND T2D, Without Other Risks, Not Tied to Excess Mortality – MedPage Today (free registration required)

 

2 – Absolute risk and predictors of the growth of acute spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis of individual patient data – The Lancet Neurology (free)

Commentary: Brain scan checklist set to boost care for stroke survivors – University of Edinburgh, via EurekAlert (free)

 

3 – Trends in Use of Daily Chest Radiographs Among US Adults Receiving Mechanical Ventilation – JAMA Network Open (free)

Commentaries: Daily Chest X-Rays Still Overused in Mechanically Ventilated Patients – MedicalResearch.com (free) AND Routine daily CXRs for ventilated patients: de-adoption is lagging – Univadis (free registration required) AND Chest x-rays overused on ventilation patients despite ACR guideline – HealthImaging (free)

 

4 – Editorial: Making diagnostic tests as essential as medicines – BMJ Global Health (free)

Related: Report: First-ever WHO List of Essential Diagnostic Tests (free report and news release) AND The WHO Essential Diagnostic List: A Tool for the Future (free commentaries)

 

5 – How Unpaywall is transforming open science – Nature News (free)

Related: Unlocking paywalled research papers (legally) (free commentaries) AND Half of papers searched for online are free to read (free)

We have been using the Unpaywall Extension for a while, and it is indeed a handy tool to find free versions (entirely legal) of paywalled articles.

 

6 – Long-Term Prognosis of Patients With Takotsubo Syndrome – Journal of the American College of Cardiology (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: Long-Term Prognosis of Takotsubo Syndrome – American College of Cardiology (free) AND How deadly is Takotsubo syndrome? It depends on the trigger – Cardiovascular Business (free)

Related: International Expert Consensus Document on Takotsubo Syndrome (free)

 

7 – Perspective: Medical students are skipping class in droves — and making lectures increasingly obsolete – STAT (free)

 

8 – Ebola virus disease in the Democratic Republic of the Congo – Operational readiness and preparedness in neighbouring countries – World Health Organization (free)

Related: WHO chief calls for end to fighting in Congo to halt Ebola spread – The Guardian (free) AND Ebola cases mounting in DRC as region prepares for more – CIDRAP (free)

 

9 – Association Between Traumatic Brain Injury and Risk of Suicide – JAMA (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: Traumatic brain injury tied to increased risk of suicide – Reuters (free) AND Risk of Suicide Increases After TBI, Study Finds – Psychiatric News Alert (free) AND Expert reaction to traumatic brain injury and suicide – Science Media Centre (free)

 

10 – Amisulpride and olanzapine followed by open-label treatment with clozapine in first-episode schizophrenia and schizophreniform disorder (OPTiMiSE): a three-phase switching study – The Lancet Psychiatry (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: Switching Anti-Psychotic Medications Doesn’t Improve Outcomes in First-Episode Schizophrenia Patients – Mount Sinai (free) AND No Benefit of Switching Antipsychotics in Early Schizophrenia – Medscape (free registration required) AND No Gain with Antipsych Meds Switch in Schizophrenia – MedPage Today (free registration required)

 

Wed, August 15 – 10 Stories of The Day!

15 Aug,2018

 

1 – State of the Art Review: Overdiagnosis in primary care: framing the problem and finding solutions – The BMJ (free for two weeks)

 

2 – Genome-wide polygenic scores for common diseases identify individuals with risk equivalent to monogenic mutations – Nature Genetics (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: Researchers predict risk for common deadly diseases from millions of genetic variants – Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, ScienceDaily (free) AND Clues to Your Health Are Hidden at 6.6 Million Spots in Your DNA – The New York Times (10 articles per month are free) AND Multi-gene test may find risk for heart disease and more – Associated Press (free) AND A Harvard Scientist Thinks He Has a Gene Test for Heart Attack Risk. He Wants to Give It Away Free – Forbes (free)

  

3 – Fixed Low-Dose Triple Combination Antihypertensive Medication vs Usual Care for Blood Pressure Control in Patients With Mild to Moderate Hypertension in Sri Lanka: A Randomized Clinical Trial – JAMA (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Video Summary: Fixed-Dose Combination Pill for Hypertension Treatment in Sri Lanka (free)

Commentaries: Three-in-one pill lowers blood pressure significantly, study say – UPI (free) AND Innovative triple pill significantly lowers blood pressure, study finds – George Institute for Global Health, via EurekAlert (free)

 

4 – Richard Smith: The polypill and the long journey to major impact – The BMJ Opinion (free)

Related Reviews: Strengths and Limitations of Using the Polypill in Cardiovascular Prevention – Current Cardiology Reports (free) AND The polypill approach – An innovative strategy to improve cardiovascular health in Europe – BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology (free)

 

5 – Cancer in People Living with HIV – NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology – Journal of the National Cancer Center Network (free)

 

6 – Opinion: Lessons for physicians from ‘The Bleeding Edge’: If you see something, say something – STAT (free)

“…physicians must act decisively when they identify the rare outlier in their midst. To do anything less would risk our credibility. Worse still, it could risk the lives of the people we took an oath not to harm.”

 

7 – Yoga, Depression, & Clinical Trial Critique 101 – Hilda Bastian, in Absolutely Maybe Blog (free)

“5 steps to unpack a randomized trial!” (via @hildabast, see Tweet)

 

8 – DRC Ebola cases surpass earlier outbreak total, virus infects 4 more health workers – CIDRAP (free)

Related: DRC may provide model for containing future Ebola outbreaks – The Conversation (free)

 

9 – Book: Diabetes in America, 3rd Edition – National Institutes of Health (free chapters)

News Release: New NIH reference book is one-stop resource for diabetes medical information – National Institutes of Health (free)

 

10 – Treatments for women with gestational diabetes mellitus: an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews – Cochrane Library (free)

Summary: Treatments to improve pregnancy outcomes for women who develop diabetes during pregnancy: an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews – Cochrane Library (free)

 

Tue, August 14 – 10 Stories of The Day!

14 Aug,2018

 

1 – Clinically applicable deep learning for diagnosis and referral in retinal disease – Nature Medicine (free for a limited period)

Commentaries: Opening the ‘black box,’ Google DeepMind AI system diagnoses eye diseases and shows its work – STAT (free) AND Artificial intelligence tool ‘as good as experts’ at detecting eye problems – The Guardian (free)

 

2 – Automated deep-neural-network surveillance of cranial images for acute neurologic events – Nature Medicine (free for a limited period)

Commentaries: Artificial Intelligence Platform Screens for Acute Neurological Illnesses at Mount Sinai – Mount Sinai Health System, via NewsWise (free) AND AI diagnoses neurological diseases on CT in 1.2 seconds – Health Imaging (free) AND New AI system can screen for neurological illnesses in seconds – UPI (free)

 

3 – Screening for Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Recommendation From the Women’s Preventive Services Initiative – Annals of Internal Medicine (free)

Commentaries: WPSI says screen all women annually for urinary incontinence – American College of Physicians, via EurekAlert (free)

 

4 – Diagnosis of Invasive Fungal Diseases in Haematology and Oncology. 2018 Update of the Recommendations of the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society for Hematology and Medical Oncology (AGIHO) – Mycosis (free PDF)

 

5 – American Academy of Family Physicians: Twenty Things Physicians and Patients Should Question (free)

Commentary: Choosing Wisely: New Practices to Avoid in Family Medicine – NEJM Journal Watch (free)

See complete lists of low-value practices: Choosing Wisely U.S. / Choosing Wisely UKChoosing Wisely Australia AND Choosing Wisely Canada

 

6 – Analysis of clinical benefit, harms, and cost-effectiveness of screening women for abdominal aortic aneurysm – The Lancet (free)

Commentaries: Should we screen women for abdominal aortic aneurysm? – The Lancet (free) AND Cost-Effectiveness of Screening Women for AAA – American College of Cardiology (free) AND Women Likely Not Good Targets for AAA Screening, Study Suggests – TCTMD (free)

 

7 – Prevalence and Estimated Economic Burden of Substandard and Falsified Medicines in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis – JAMA Network Open (free)

Commentaries: Prevalence of Substandard and Falsified Essential Medicines: Still an Incomplete Picture – JAMA Network Open (free) AND New Study Finds Fake, Low-Quality Medicines Prevalent in the Developing World – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, via R&D (free)

 

8 – Evaluating Shared Decision Making for Lung Cancer Screening – JAMA Internal Medicine (free for a limited period)

Editorial: Failing Grade for Shared Decision Making for Lung Cancer Screening (free for a limited period)

Author Interview: Evaluating Shared Decision Making for Lung Cancer Screening (free audio)

Commentaries: Doctors may not explain pros, cons of lung cancer screening – Reuters (free) AND Shared Decision-Making Flops for Lung Ca Screening – MedPage Today (free registration required)

 

9 – Perspective: Surrogate End Points Ain’t all that Bad – The Health Care Blog (free) (via @RogueRad)

 

10 – Excess mortality and cardiovascular disease in young adults with type 1 diabetes in relation to age at onset: a nationwide, register-based cohort study – The Lancet (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: Early type 1 diabetes shortens women’s lives by 18 years – University of Gothenburg, via ScienceDaily (free) AND Early age type 1 diabetes linked to shorter life expectancy than later age diagnosis – OnMedica (free)

 

Mon, August 13 – 10 Stories of The Day!

13 Aug,2018

 

1 – Corticosteroid therapy for sepsis: a clinical practice guideline – The BMJ (free)

 

2 – Outbreaks: Behind the headlines – World Health Organization (free)

 

3 – Risk Factors Associated With Major Cardiovascular Events 1 Year After Acute Myocardial Infarction – JAMA Network Open (free)

Commentaries: Algorithm IDs Patients at Risk of Post-MI Events – MedPage Today (free registration required) AND Risk Model Helps Predict CV Events 1 Year After Acute MI – Medscape (free registration required)

 

4 – Analysis: Renaming low risk conditions labelled as cancer – The BMJ (free for a limited period)

Commentaries: Is it time to remove the cancer label from low-risk conditions? – The Conversation (free) AND Doctors should avoid saying ‘cancer’ for minor lesions – study – The Guardian (free) Drop ‘cancer’ label to protect patients from over-treatment, researchers say – The Sidney Morning Herald (free)

 

5 – Review: Dos and Don’ts in the Management of Cirrhosis: A View from the 21st Century – American Journal of Gastroenterology (via @Abraham_RMI)

 

6 – The multivitamin industry rakes in billions of dollars. But science says we’re not getting healthier – by Timothy Caulfield, in NBC News THINK (free)

Related Study: Association of Multivitamin and Mineral Supplementation and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis – Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes (free) AND Editorial: Multivitamins Do Not Reduce Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality and Should Not Be Taken for This Purpose: How Do We Know That? (free)

“Unless you have a clinically identified deficiency, the research tells us there is little reason to consume supplements.”

 

7 – Tick- and Mosquito-Borne Diseases Are Increasing Dramatically – Scientific American (free)

Related: CDC Report: U.S Trends in Vector-borne Diseases (link to report and commentaries)

 

8 – Infographic: High burden, low budget: non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries – Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (free) (via @equitylist)

 

9 – Multifactorial and multiple component interventions for preventing falls in older people living in the community – Cochrane Library (free)

Summary: Featured Review: Multifactorial and multiple component interventions for preventing falls in older people living in the community – Cochrane Library (free)

 

10 – Analysis of the Global Burden of Disease study highlights the global, regional, and national trends of chronic kidney disease epidemiology from 1990 to 2016 – Kidney International (free)

News release and visual abstract: KI article shows the doubling incidence, prevalence and mortality of CKD – International Society of Nephrology (free)

Commentary: Global Burden of Kidney Disease on the Rise, Unequally Distributed – Medscape (free registration required)

 

Fri, August 10 – 10 Stories of The Day!

10 Aug,2018

 

1 – Dietary Diversity: Implications for Obesity Prevention in Adult Populations: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association – Circulation (free PDF)

News Release: A diverse diet may not be the healthiest one (free)

Commentary: Diet Recommendations for Obesity Prevention: Time to Ditch Diversity (free)

Top Ten Things to Know: Dietary Diversity: Implications for Obesity Prevention in Adult Populations (free PDF)

 

2 – Opioid prescribing decreases after learning of a patient’s fatal overdose – Science (free for a limited period)

Commentary: Notification of patient overdose deaths reduces clinician opioid prescriptions – NIH News Releases (free) AND Clinicians were told their patient had died of an overdose. Then opioid prescribing dropped – STAT (free)

 

3 – Comparative efficacy and tolerability of medications for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in children, adolescents, and adults: a systematic review and network meta-analysis – The Lancet Psychiatry (free)

Commentaries: Refining treatment choices for ADHD – The Lancet Psychiatry (free) AND ADHD medications: Of all available drugs, methylphenidate should be first option for short-term treatment in children – ScienceDaily (free) AND Analysis of ADHD Drugs: Use Methylphenidate in Kids, Amphetamines in Adults – Physician’s First Watch (free)

Related: Cochrane Review: Adverse Events of Methylphenidate for ADHD in Children and Adolescents (link to abstract and free summary) AND Short Review: Stimulants for ADHD in children (free) AND Opinion: Drug treatment of ADHD – tenuous scientific basis (free)

 

4 – Viewpoint: Clinical Practice Guidelines: What’s Next? – JAMA (free for a limited period)

 

5 – Urinary sodium excretion, blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and mortality: a community-level prospective epidemiological cohort study – The Lancet (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentary: Lancet Paper Adds To Evidence That Reducing Salt To Very Low Levels May Be Dangerous – CardioBrief (free)

Related Report: Salt intake and Cardiovascular Disease (free report and commentaries)

 

6 – Are the “Best Buys” for Alcohol Control Still Valid? An Update on the Comparative Cost-Effectiveness of Alcohol Control Strategies at the Global Level – Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs (free)

Commentary: Higher alcohol taxes are cost-effective in reducing alcohol harms – ScienceDaily (free)

Related: To improve global health, tax the things that are killing us – Financial Times (free policies, articles and commentaries) AND Policy lessons from health taxes (free research and commentaries)

 

7 – Nonsurgical Treatments for Urinary Incontinence in Women: A Systematic Review Update – Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (free)

See also: Full Report (free PDF)

 

8 – Scaled deployment of Wolbachia to protect the community from Aedes transmitted arboviruses – Gates Open Research (free)

Commentary: Dengue rates plummet in Australian city after release of modified mosquitoes – Nature News (free)

 

9 – Disease Outbreak News: Ebola virus disease – Democratic Republic of the Congo – World Health Organization (free)

Related: DRC probes more suspected Ebola cases, rules out 3 – CIDRAP (free) AND War zone complicates roll-out of Ebola vaccine in latest outbreak – Nature News (free)

 

10 – Association of Endometrial Cancer Risk With Postmenopausal Bleeding in Women: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis – JAMA Internal Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: How common is endometrial cancer in women with postmenopausal bleeding? – eCancer News (free) AND Postmenopausal Bleeding: Reliable Sign of Endometrial Cancer – Medscape (free registration required)

 

Thu, August 9 – 10 Stories of The Day!

9 Aug,2018

 

1 – Practice guideline update recommendations summary: Disorders of consciousness – American Academy of Neurology (free PDF)

Related: Ethical, palliative, and policy considerations in disorders of consciousness – Neurology (free PDF) AND Comprehensive systematic review update summary: Disorders of consciousness – Neurology (free PDF)

Commentaries: New Guideline Released for Managing Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States – American Academy of Neurology, via NewsWise (free) AND Groups Issue New Disorders of Consciousness Guidelines – MedPage Today (free registration required)

 

2 – Labor Induction versus Expectant Management in Low-Risk Nulliparous Women – New England Journal of Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Quick Take Video Summary: Labor Induction versus Expectant Management in Low-Risk Women (free)

Commentaries: Induced labor at 39 weeks may reduce likelihood of C-section, NIH study suggests – NIH News Releases (free) AND Pregnancy Debate Revisited: To Induce Labor, Or Not? – NPR (free)

 

3 – Vitamin D Supplementation in Pregnancy and Lactation and Infant Growth – New England Journal of Medicine (free)

Commentary: Maternal Vitamin D Supplementation Doesn’t Improve Infant Growth – Physician’s First Watch (free)

 

4 – Outcomes of Cardiac Screening in Adolescent Soccer Players – New England Journal of Medicine (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: Footballer heart death risk ‘underestimated’ – BBC (free) AND No Easy Answers on Best Heart Check-Up for Young Athletes – Associated Press, via NYT (free)

 

5 – Would technology enabled remote consulting save time and add value in primary care? – The BMJ Opinion (free)

“Would remote consulting save time and add value in primary care? Rising multimorbidity makes the evaluation of potentially time saving technologies ever more necessary” (via @bmj_latest see Tweet)

 

6 – Treatment for Bipolar Disorder in Adults: A Systematic Review – Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (free)

See also: Full Report (free PDF) AND Evidence Summary (free PDF)

 

7 – WHO MERS Global Summary and Assessment of Risk – World Health Organization (free PDF)

Commentary: WHO highlights ongoing hospital MERS outbreak threat – CIDRAP (free)

 

8 – Perspective: Addressing Barriers to Inclusion of Pregnant Women in Clinical Trials – JAMA (free for a limited period)

 

9 – Publication bias: The answer to your research question may be sitting in somebody’s file drawer – Students 4 Best Evidence (free)

Related: Bias in medical research: A glossary of common research biases – First10Em (free) Catalogue of Bias – Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, University of Oxford (free)

 

10 – Association between physical exercise and mental health in 1·2 million individuals in the USA between 2011 and 2015: a cross-sectional study – The Lancet Psychiatry (link to abstract – $ for full-text)

Commentaries: Expert reaction to physical activity linked to improved mental health – Science Media Centre (free) AND Regular exercise ‘best for mental health’ – BBC (free) AND Exercise is good for your body and your mind, study says – CNN (free)

 

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